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Holdup, search, and inefficiency

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  • Shingo Ishiguro

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Abstract

This paper investigates the holdup problem in the dynamic search market where buyers and sellers search for their trading partners and specific investments are made after match but before trade. We show that frictionless (competitive) market imposes severe limitations on attainable efficiencies: Markets with small friction make the holdup problem more serious than those with large friction because in any equilibrium, whether stationary or non-stationary, investment must be dropped down to the minimum level and trade must be delayed with positive probability.
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Suggested Citation

  • Shingo Ishiguro, 2010. "Holdup, search, and inefficiency," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 44(2), pages 307-338, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joecth:v:44:y:2010:i:2:p:307-338 DOI: 10.1007/s00199-009-0471-z
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Nicita & Simone Sepe, 2012. "Incomplete contracts and competition: another look at fisher body/general motors?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 495-514, December.
    2. Antonio Nicita, 2013. "Managing Strategically Outside Options under Incomplete Contracts," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 361-374, September.
    3. Antonio Nicita & Massimiliano Vatiero, 2014. "Dixit versus Williamson: the ‘fundamental transformation’ reconsidered," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 439-453, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Delay of trade; Holdup problem; Search; C72; C78;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory

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