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Specific Performance, Separability Condition and the Hold-Up Problem

  • M'hand Fares

    ()

    (INRA (AGIR) and University of Paris 1)

Edlin and Reichelstein (1996) claim that an efficient solution to the hold-up problem can be implemented with a specific performance contract if a separability condition is satisfied, i.e. if the effect of investments and the effect of the state of the world enter the parties valuation functions in an additively separable manner. This note shows that this separability condition generates the same solution than if the valuation functions are independent of the sate of nature (proposition 1). This implies that a simple menu of prices that does not specify the level of trade can solve the hold-up problem (proposition 2). That is, specifying the terms of trade by writing a specific performance contract is useless with the separability condition.

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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 29 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 2055-2062

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00153
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  10. William P. Rogerson, 1992. "Contractual Solutions to the Hold-Up Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(4), pages 777-793.
  11. Anderlini, L. & Felli, L., 1999. "Costly bargaining and renegotiation," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 9910, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  12. MacLeod, W Bentley & Malcomson, James M, 1993. "Investments, Holdup, and the Form of Market Contracts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 811-37, September.
  13. M'hand Fares, 2006. "Renegotiation Design and Contract Solutions to the Hold-Up Problem," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(5), pages 731-756, December.
  14. Wagener, Andreas, 2006. "Chebyshev's Algebraic Inequality and comparative statics under uncertainty," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 217-221, September.
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