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On the demand for smoking quitlines

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  • Rajeev Goel

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Abstract

Using recent cross-state U.S. data, this paper estimates the demand for calls to smoking quitlines. Besides formal insights into the determinants of quitline demand, another key contribution is to provide unique insights on the role of related internet resources, using two novel measures. Results show that higher cigarette prices, lower income, and greater government resources increase the demand for quitline calls, with the internet measures having positive but statistically insignificant effects. In terms of magnitude, the elasticity of quitline calls with respect to cigarette prices was about four times greater than that with respect to public funds for quitlines. Policy implications are discussed. Copyright © Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Rajeev Goel, 2015. "On the demand for smoking quitlines," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(1), pages 201-210, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jecfin:v:39:y:2015:i:1:p:201-210
    DOI: 10.1007/s12197-013-9278-7
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12197-013-9278-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chee-Ruey Hsieh, 1998. "Health risk and the decision to quit smoking," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(6), pages 795-804.
    2. Rajeev Goel, 2007. "Costs of smoking and attempts to quit," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(7), pages 853-857.
    3. Rosemary Avery & Donald Kenkel & Dean R. Lillard & Alan Mathios, 2007. "Private Profits and Public Health: Does Advertising of Smoking Cessation Products Encourage Smokers to Quit?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 447-481.
    4. Harris, William T. & Harris, Lydia, 1996. "The decision to quit smoking: Theory and evidence," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 601-618.
    5. Ramanan Laxminarayan & Anil Deolalikar, 2004. "Tobacco initiation, cessation, and change: evidence from Vietnam," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(12), pages 1191-1201.
    6. Lanoie, Paul & Leclair, Paul, 1998. "Taxation or regulation:: Looking for a good anti-smoking policy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 85-89, January.
    7. Shane Allwright, 2008. "The impact of banning smoking in workplaces," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 81-92, July.
    8. Goel, Rajeev K. & Nelson, Michael A., 2007. "The Master Settlement Agreement and cigarette tax policy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 431-438.
    9. Henrik Hammar & Fredrik Carlsson, 2005. "Smokers' expectations to quit smoking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 257-267.
    10. Rajeev K. Goel, 2011. "Advertising Media And Cigarette Demand," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(4), pages 404-416, October.
    11. Craig A. Gallet & John A. List, 2003. "Cigarette demand: a meta-analysis of elasticities," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(10), pages 821-835.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Quitlines; Smoking; Cigarettes; Demand; Internet; Master Settlement Agreement; United States; I10; I18;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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