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Quitting behaviour of cigarette smokers. Are there direct effects of a screening program?

Author

Listed:
  • Line Bretteville-Jensen, Anne

    (Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research (SIRUS) and Institute of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo)

  • Biørn, Erik

    () (Dept. of Economics, University of Oslo)

  • Selmer, Randi

    (Norwegian Institute for Public Health)

Abstract

This paper aims at i) providing effect estimates of a wide range of covariates and traditional policy means to increase the smoking cessation rate, ii) offering evidence on alternative interventions for health authorities, and iii) examining and comparing three groups of smokers with varying lengths of their smoking career (including one group that has smoked 25 years). All smokers have been subject to a three-wave cardiovascular screening and followed up over a maximum of 14 years. This rich panel data set has been merged with administrative registers. A flexible discrete-time duration model is used to examine the effect of 5 categories of explanatory variables: personal characteristics; indicators of addiction status; economic factors; health and health shock variables; governmental interventions. Most covariates differ across groups, but for all groups did the screening participation years stand out as important. Possible policy implications for future cessation interventions are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Line Bretteville-Jensen, Anne & Biørn, Erik & Selmer, Randi, 2011. "Quitting behaviour of cigarette smokers. Are there direct effects of a screening program?," Memorandum 07/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:2011_007
    as

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    File URL: https://www.sv.uio.no/econ/english/research/unpublished-works/working-papers/pdf-files/2011/Memo-07-2011.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John A. Tauras & Frank J. Chaloupka, 1999. "Determinants of Smoking Cessation: An Analysis of Young Adult Men and Women," NBER Working Papers 7262, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Clark, Andrew & Etile, Fabrice, 2002. "Do health changes affect smoking? Evidence from British panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 533-562, July.
    3. DeCicca, Philip & Kenkel, Don & Mathios, Alan, 2008. "Cigarette taxes and the transition from youth to adult smoking: Smoking initiation, cessation, and participation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 904-917, July.
    4. Michael P. Kidd & Sandra Hopkins, 2004. "The Hazards of Starting and Quitting Smoking: Some Australian Evidence," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(249), pages 177-192, June.
    5. Jones, Andrew M., 1994. "Health, addiction, social interaction and the decision to quit smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 93-110, March.
    6. Philip DeCicca & Donald Kenkel & Alan Mathios, 2002. "Putting Out the Fires: Will Higher Taxes Reduce the Onset of Youth Smoking?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 144-169, February.
    7. Martin Forster & Andrew M. Jones, "undated". "The role of tobacco taxes in starting and quitting smoking," Discussion Papers 00/51, Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Craig A. Gallet & John A. List, 2003. "Cigarette demand: a meta-analysis of elasticities," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(10), pages 821-835.
    9. DeCicca, Philip & McLeod, Logan, 2008. "Cigarette taxes and older adult smoking: Evidence from recent large tax increases," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 918-929, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Smoking behaviour; Cigarette cessation; Duration model; Quitting hazard; Long-term smokers; Health status and shocks; Screening; Policy intervention; Panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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