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Carbon and energy taxation for CO2 mitigation: a CGE model of the Malaysia

Listed author(s):
  • Masoud Yahoo

    ()

    (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM))

  • Jamal Othman

    ()

    (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM))

Registered author(s):

    Abstract Malaysia has made a pledge to reduce voluntarily her carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2-e) gas emission’s intensity of gross domestic product by up to 40 % based on 2005 levels by 2020. The country is considering implementing economic instruments, among others, to assist the achievement of emission reduction targets while contributing towards the nation’s energy security and sustainable development goals. This paper develops a computable general equilibrium model with explicit energy-emission linkages to appraise the economy-wide and welfare impacts of carbon and energy tax policies to reduce CO2 emissions in Malaysia. Results indicate that the negative macroeconomic impacts of carbon and energy taxes are small relative to the quantum of emission reduction. A Hicksian welfare criterion is utilized to determine the impact of revenue natural shifts in carbon and energy taxes. Revenue neutrality assumptions show that carbon taxation is the best choice when it can provide a double dividend if the generated revenue is used for the purpose of consumption subsidy on household purchases. The notion of the double dividend is confirmed when the change in the consumption structure will result in a welfare improvement, while CO2 emission is decreased effectively. The study also found that carbon tax policy results in greater emission reductions relative to energy taxes, while the use of renewable energy will increase more substantially.

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    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10668-015-9725-z
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Environment, Development and Sustainability.

    Volume (Year): 19 (2017)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 239-262

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:endesu:v:19:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10668-015-9725-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s10668-015-9725-z
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    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/10668

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