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Explaining Productivity Growth: The Role of Demographics

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Beaudry
  • Fabrice Collard
  • David A. Green

    ()

Abstract

The impact of demographic developments on productivity is still a little-explored subject. The authors find a strong and unexpected link between slow labour productivity growth and rapid labour force growth over the period from the mid 1970s to the mid 1990s. They situate this finding in the context of an adjustment period following a technological revolution, by which economies with more rapid labour force growth experience a more painful transition than other economies due to the greater amount of learning that is required in adopting the new technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Beaudry & Fabrice Collard & David A. Green, 2005. "Explaining Productivity Growth: The Role of Demographics," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 10, pages 45-58, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:10:y:2005:3
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Beaudry & Fabrice Collard, 2003. "Recent Technological and Economic Change among Industrialized Countries: Insights from Population Growth," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(3), pages 441-464, September.
    2. Durlauf, Steven N. & Quah, Danny T., 1999. "The new empirics of economic growth," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 235-308 Elsevier.
    3. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    4. Paul Beaudry & David A. Green, 2002. "Population Growth, Technological Adoption, and Economic Outcomes in the Information Era," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 749-774, October.
    5. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Paul Beaudry & David Green, 1998. "What is Driving US and Canadian Wages: Exogenous Technical Change or Endogenous Choice of Technique?," NBER Working Papers 6853, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Paul Beaudry & Fabrice Collard & David Green, 2005. "Demographics and recent productivity performance: insights from cross-country comparisons," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 309-344, May.
    8. Paul Beaudry & David Green, 2000. "The Changing Structure of Wages in the US and Germany: What Explains the Differences?," NBER Working Papers 7697, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea De Michelis & Marcello Estevão & Beth Anne Wilson, 2013. "Productivity or Employment: Is It a Choice?," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 25, pages 41-60, Spring.
    2. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2011. "Japan’s Economic Recovery: Insights from Multi-Region Dynamics," CAMA Working Papers 2011-18, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Don Drummond & Evan Capeluck & Matthew Calver, 2015. "The Key Challenge for Canadian Public Policy: Generating Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth," CSLS Research Reports 2015-11, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Capital; Productivity; Firm-level; Labour Productivity; Information and Communication Technology; ICT; Learning; Labour Force Growth; Demographics;

    JEL classification:

    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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