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Recent Technological and Economic Change among Industrialized Countries : Insights from Population Growth


  • Beaudry, Paul
  • Collard, Fabrice


Cross-country observations on the effects of population growth are used to show why differences in rates of growth in working-age population may be a key to understanding differences in economic performance across industrialized countries over the period 1975-1997 versus 1960-1974. In particular, we argue that countries with lower rates of adult population growth adopted new capital-intensive technologies more quickly than their high population growth counterparts, therefore allowing them to reduce their work time without deterioration of growth in output-per-adult. Copyright The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics", 2003 .
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  • Beaudry, Paul & Collard, Fabrice, 2001. "Recent Technological and Economic Change among Industrialized Countries : Insights from Population Growth," IDEI Working Papers 135, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse, revised 2003.
  • Handle: RePEc:ide:wpaper:622

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bresnahan, Timothy F. & Trajtenberg, M., 1995. "General purpose technologies 'Engines of growth'?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 83-108, January.
    2. anonymous, 1995. "Does the bouncing ball lead to economic growth?," Regional Update, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jul, pages 1-2,4-6.
    3. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Inflation and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 121-144, May.
    4. Daron Acemoglu, 1999. "Changes in Unemployment and Wage Inequality: An Alternative Theory and Some Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1259-1278, December.
    5. Robert M. Solow, 1956. "A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(1), pages 65-94.
    6. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    7. Xavier Sala-I-Martin, 1997. "Transfers, Social Safety Nets, and Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 44(1), pages 81-102, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Colantonio Emiliano & D'Angelo Francesca & Odoardi Iacopo & Scamuffa Domenico, 2010. "Internationalization And Innovation: The Challenges For Europe In A Changing World," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 214-219, December.
    2. Ross Guest, 2013. "Population Ageing and Productivity: Implications and Policy Options for New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/21, New Zealand Treasury.
    3. Biehl, Kai & Fent, Thomas, 2007. "Vorausschätzungen für die Entwicklung der Gesamtbevölkerung und der Beschäftigung in Österreich bis 2035
      [Projections of the Development of Population and Employment in Austria until 2035]
      ," MPRA Paper 2877, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Paul Beaudry & Fabrice Collard & David A. Green, 2005. "Explaining Productivity Growth: The Role of Demographics," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 10, pages 45-58, Spring.

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