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Rural Industrialisation and Internal Migration in China

Author

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  • Zai Liang

    (Department of Sociology, City University of New York-Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11365-1597, USA, liang@troll.soc.qc.edu)

  • Yiu Por Chen

    (Labor Studies Program, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA)

  • Yanmin Gu

    (National University of Singapore)

Abstract

To avoid the problems of overcrowding and urban unemployment that are associated with overurbanisation observed in other developing countries, China has, since the late 1970s, actively pursued a strategy of rural industrialisation by encouraging the development of rural industries which provide employment opportunities for the surplus labour in agriculture. In this paper, we examine the impact of rural industrialisation on migration using data from the 1990 China Population Census. We use robust estimation of logit models that not only captures the impact of rural industrialisation on migration propensity but also takes into account the nature of clustered data (individuals within provinces). In our estimates, rural industrialisation does not have a statistically significant impact on the probability of either intraprovincial or interprovincial migration. Thus the results cast some doubt about whether China can move on a unique path towards urbanisation.

Suggested Citation

  • Zai Liang & Yiu Por Chen & Yanmin Gu, 2002. "Rural Industrialisation and Internal Migration in China," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(12), pages 2175-2187, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:39:y:2002:i:12:p:2175-2187
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    Cited by:

    1. Shuming Bao & Örn B. Bodvarsson & Jack W. Hou & Yaohui Zhao, 2011. "The Regulation Of Migration In A Transition Economy: China'S Hukou System," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(4), pages 564-579, October.
    2. Fukase, Emiko, 2013. "Foreign job opportunities and internal migration in Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6420, The World Bank.
    3. Bodvarsson, Örn B. & Hou, Jack W. & Shen, Kailing, 2014. "Aging and Migration in a Transition Economy: The Case of China," IZA Discussion Papers 8351, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Nong Zhu & Xubei Luo & Heng-fu Zou, 2012. "Migration, Urbanization and City Growth in China," CEMA Working Papers 545, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    5. Jialu Liu, 2011. "Human capital, migration and rural entrepreneurship in China," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 100-122, September.
    6. Li Zhang, 2013. "Urbanization, farm dependence and population change in China1," Chapters,in: Handbook of Rural Development, chapter 15, pages i-ii Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. repec:spr:ariqol:v:13:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11482-017-9521-z is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Yiu Por Chen, 2012. "Land use rights, market transitions, and labour policy change in China (1980–84)," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(4), pages 705-743, October.
    9. Jialu Liu, 2010. "Does Migration Income Help Hometown Business? Evidences from Rural Households Survey in China," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(4), pages 2598-2611.
    10. Chang, Hongqin & Dong, Xiao-yuan & MacPhail, Fiona, 2011. "Labor Migration and Time Use Patterns of the Left-behind Children and Elderly in Rural China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2199-2210.
    11. Li Zhang, 2011. "Farm Dependence and Population Change in China," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(5), pages 751-779, October.
    12. Dudley Poston & Li Zhang, 2008. "Ecological Analyses of Permanent and Temporary Migration Streams in China in the 1990s," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(6), pages 689-712, December.
    13. Emiko Fukase, 2014. "Job Opportunities in Foreign Firms and Internal Migration in Vietnam," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 28(3), pages 279-299, September.
    14. Bao, Shuming & Bodvarsson, Örn B. & Hou, Jack W. & Zhao, Yaohui, 2007. "Interprovincial Migration in China: The Effects of Investment and Migrant Networks," IZA Discussion Papers 2924, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. McGuire, William & Fleisher, Belton & Sheldon, Ian M., 2007. "Off-Farm Employment Opportunities and Educational Attainment in Rural China," 2007: China's Agricultural Trade: Issues and Prospects Symposium, July 2007, Beijing, China 55029, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.

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