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The Age of Migration in China

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  • Zai Liang

Abstract

Using data from the 1987 and 1995 China One Percent Population Sample Surveys, this article examines migration patterns during 1982-95, a period of sweeping social and economic changes in China. Several major patterns are evident: the increase in overall migration and especially in temporary migration, the increasing importance of inter-provincial migration, and the concentration of migrants in the coastal region. Over time, migrants of rural origin were more likely to choose cities as destinations than towns. The consequences and implications of the changes in migration patterns are explored. Copyright 2001 by The Population Council, Inc..

Suggested Citation

  • Zai Liang, 2001. "The Age of Migration in China," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(3), pages 499-524.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:27:y:2001:i:3:p:499-524
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    Cited by:

    1. Holly Reed, 2013. "Moving Across Boundaries: Migration in South Africa, 1950–2000," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(1), pages 71-95, February.
    2. Shuming Bao & Örn B. Bodvarsson & Jack W. Hou & Yaohui Zhao, 2011. "The Regulation Of Migration In A Transition Economy: China'S Hukou System," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(4), pages 564-579, October.
    3. Chengfeng Yang & Huiran Han & Jinping Song, 2014. "Spatial Distribution of Migration and Economic Development: A Case Study of Sichuan Province, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(10), pages 1-20, September.
    4. Zhang, Yi & Matz, Julia Anna, 2017. "On the train to brain gain in rural China," Discussion Papers 252443, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    5. Dudley Poston & Li Zhang, 2008. "Ecological Analyses of Permanent and Temporary Migration Streams in China in the 1990s," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(6), pages 689-712, December.
    6. Gavin Jones & Divya Ramchand, 2013. "Education and human capital development in the giants of Asia," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 27(1), pages 40-61, May.
    7. Gao, Qin & Zhai, Fuhua & Garfinkel, Irwin, 2010. "How Does Public Assistance Affect Family Expenditures? The Case of Urban China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 989-1000, July.
    8. Luo,Xubei & Zhu,Nong, 2015. "Hub-periphery development pattern and inclusive growth : case study of Guangdong province," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7509, The World Bank.
    9. Chen, Yiu Por (Vincent), 2015. "Fiscal Decentralization, Rural Industrialization, and Undocumented Labor Mobility in Rural China (1982-87)," IZA Discussion Papers 9024, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Du, Yang & Park, Albert & Wang, Sangui, 2005. "Migration and rural poverty in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 688-709, December.
    11. Bodvarsson, Örn B. & Hou, Jack W. & Shen, Kailing, 2014. "Aging and Migration in a Transition Economy: The Case of China," IZA Discussion Papers 8351, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Bao, Shuming & Bodvarsson, Örn B. & Hou, Jack W. & Zhao, Yaohui, 2007. "Interprovincial Migration in China: The Effects of Investment and Migrant Networks," IZA Discussion Papers 2924, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. repec:eee:chieco:v:47:y:2018:i:c:p:142-155 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Li Zhang, 2013. "Urbanization, farm dependence and population change in China1," Chapters,in: Handbook of Rural Development, chapter 15, pages i-ii Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Yuying Tong & Martin Piotrowski, 2012. "Migration and Health Selectivity in the Context of Internal Migration in China, 1997–2009," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(4), pages 497-543, August.
    16. Martin Piotrowski & Yuying Tong & Yueyun Zhang & Lu Chao, 2016. "The Transition to First Marriage in China, 1966–2008: An Examination of Gender Differences in Education and Hukou Status," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 129-154, February.
    17. Mingqiong Zhang & Cherrie Jiuhua Zhu & Chris Nyland, 2014. "The Institution of Hukou-based Social Exclusion: A Unique Institution Reshaping the Characteristics of Contemporary Urban China," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 1437-1457, July.

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