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Exploring the Determinants of Regional Unemployment Disparities in Small Data Sets

Listed author(s):
  • David Philip McArthur
  • Sylvia Encheva
  • Inge Thorsen
Registered author(s):

    While standard economic theory suggests that unemployment should be evenly distributed across space, casual observation of unemployment rates shows that this is not the case. This has led to the development of a substantial literature on the topic. Due to the complexity of the problem, it is not always clear what the root cause is. This is particularly true when considering a small geographic area with limited data. This article will explore what insights can be gained through the use of formal concept analysis and association rules. It is hoped that these techniques will be of use to both theoreticians and policy makers.

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    File URL: http://irx.sagepub.com/content/35/4/442.abstract
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    Article provided by in its journal International Regional Science Review.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 4 (October)
    Pages: 442-463

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    Handle: RePEc:sae:inrsre:v:35:y:2012:i:4:p:442-463
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    1. McCann, Philip, 2001. "Urban and Regional Economics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198776451.
    2. Decressin, Jorg & Fatas, Antonio, 1995. "Regional labor market dynamics in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1627-1655, December.
    3. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 1997. "The Dispersion of US State Unemployment Rates: The Role of Market and Non-market Equilibrium Factors," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(6), pages 593-606.
    4. Valentina Meliciani, 2006. "Income and employment disparities across European regions: The role of national and spatial factors," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 75-91.
    5. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2009. "Canadian regional labour market evolutions: a long-run restrictions SVAR analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(15), pages 1855-1871.
    6. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2004. "Migration and regional adjustment to asymmetric shocks in transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 230-247, June.
    7. Chiara Bentivogli & Patrizio Pagano, 1999. "Regional Disparities and Labour Mobility: the Euro-11 versus the USA," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 13(3), pages 737-760, September.
    8. Berger, Mark C. & Blomquist, Glenn C. & Sabirianova Peter, Klara, 2008. "Compensating differentials in emerging labor and housing markets: Estimates of quality of life in Russian cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 25-55, January.
    9. Stephen T. Marston, 1985. "Two Views of the Geographic Distribution of Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(1), pages 57-79.
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