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Gender and Job Chains in Local Economic Development


  • Daniel Felsenstein

    () (Hebrew University of Jerusalem Jerusalem, Israel)

  • Joseph Persky

    (University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA)


Over the past decade, the welfare evaluation of local economic development activities has become increasingly sophisticated. Projected or realized gains have been broken down by wage levels, household income levels, and race. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the distribution of gains by gender. In parallel, the gender literature has recognized the distribution of economic development activity by income group but not by vacancies. The authors present an evaluation approach—the job chains model—that combines the two. Occupations with a high proportion of women are identified and isolated at each wage level. The authors estimate the proportion of job chain vacancies induced by new “female” jobs and their welfare impacts. Findings suggest that women are underrepresented in welfare gains associated with both male and female high-wage jobs. The applicability of the authors' approach for evaluating alternative industrial targets is demonstrated.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Felsenstein & Joseph Persky, 2011. "Gender and Job Chains in Local Economic Development," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 25(2), pages 172-181, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ecdequ:v:25:y:2011:i:2:p:172-181

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    employment creation; gender; job chains;


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