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The Effects of Metropolitan Job Growth on the Size Distribution of Family Income

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Abstract

This paper examines how a metropolitan area's job growth affects its income distribution. The research uses annual Current Population Survey data on the income distribution in different metropolitan areas from 1979 through 1988. Faster metropolitan job growth increases real family income in the lowest income quintile by a significantly greater percentage than for the average family. Metropolitan job growth also increases the value of property owned by upper income quintiles, but property value effects are not large enough to offset the progressive effects of growth on labor income. Simulations indicate that economic development programs to increase metropolitan job growth will have a progressive effect if the cost per job created is low, and these costs are financed by personal taxes. But economic development programs with a high cost per job created, or financed by cutting social welfare programs, will have a net negative effect on the lowest income quintile.
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  • Timothy J. Bartik, "undated". "The Effects of Metropolitan Job Growth on the Size Distribution of Family Income," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles tjb1994jrs, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:tjb1994jrs
    Note: Appears in Journal of Regional Science 34(4): 483-501
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    File URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9787.1994.tb00879.x/abstract
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Timothy J. Bartik, 2003. "Local Economic Development Policies," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 03-91, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    2. Rebecca M. Blank & Alan S. Blinder, 1985. "Macroeconomics, Income Distribution, and Poverty," NBER Working Papers 1567, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Rod Cross, 2000. "Hysteresis and Emu," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(4), pages 367-379, November.
    4. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle, November.
    5. Blank, Rebecca M, 1989. "Disaggregating the Effect of the Business Cycle on the Distribution of Income," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(222), pages 141-163, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hilary W. Hoynes & Marianne E. Page & Ann Huff Stevens, 2006. "Poverty in America: Trends and Explanations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 47-68, Winter.
    2. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2010. "Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modelling for Regional Economic Development Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(10), pages 1311-1328.
    3. Philip Wales, 2013. "Access All Areas? The Impact of Fees and Background on Student Demand for Postgraduate Higher Education in the UK," SERC Discussion Papers 0128, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    4. Strand, Alexander & Fisher, Robin C., 2003. "Local Labor Markets and Child Poverty," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 33(3), pages 296-312.
    5. Timothy J. Bartik, 1993. "The Effects of Local Labor Demand on Individual Labor Market Outcomes for Diffrerent Demographic Groups and the Poor," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 93-23, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    6. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S. & Levernier, William, 1996. "Trends in U.S. income inequality: Evidence from a panel of states," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 17-37.
    7. Timothy J. Bartik, 2009. "Distributional Effects of Early Childhood Programs and Business Incentives and Their Implications for Policy," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 09-151, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    8. Jamie S. Partridge & Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 1998. "State Patterns In Family Income Inequality," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(3), pages 277-294, July.
    9. Note: For best results & the figures should be printed on a non-Postscript printer. Hoynes & H., "undated". "The Employment, Earnings, and Income of Less-Skilled Workers over the Business Cycle," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1199-99, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    10. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & M. Rose Olfert & Ying Tan, 2015. "When Spatial Equilibrium Fails: Is Place-Based Policy Second Best?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(8), pages 1303-1325, August.
    11. James R. Hines Jr. & Hilary W. Hoynes & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Another Look at Whether a Rising Tide Lifts All Boats," NBER Working Papers 8412, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Michael F. Dinerstein & Caroline M. Hoxby & Jonathan Meer & Pablo Villanueva, 2014. "Did the Fiscal Stimulus Work for Universities?," NBER Chapters,in: How the Financial Crisis and Great Recession Affected Higher Education, pages 263-320 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Hans Koster, 2012. "Rocketing rents: The magnitude and attenuation of agglomeration economies using commercial rents and micro-data," ERSA conference papers ersa12p892, European Regional Science Association.
    14. Timothy J. Bartik, 2009. "The Revitalization of Older Industrial Cities: A Review Essay of "Retooling for Growth"," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(1), pages 1-29.
    15. Jeffrey R. Brown & Caroline M. Hoxby, 2013. "Introduction to "How the Financial Crisis and Great Recession Affected Higher Education"," NBER Chapters,in: How the Financial Crisis and Great Recession Affected Higher Education, pages 1-13 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Angjellari-Dajci, Fiorentina & Cebula, Richard & Boylan, Robert & Borg, Rody, 2015. "Uncovering Hidden Industry Linkages in Northeast Florida’s Regional Economy: The Case for Export Expansion in Florida’s Fourth Largest MSA," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 45(2).
    17. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn & FJane Waldfogel, 2004. "The Impact of Welfare Benefits on Single Motherhood and Headship of Young Women: Evidence from the Census," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
    18. Timothy J. Bartik, 2015. "How Effects of Local Labor Demand Shocks Vary with the Initial Local Unemployment Rate," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 529-557, December.
    19. Timothy J. Bartik, 1999. "Aggregate Effects in Local Labor Markets of Supply and Demand Shocks," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 99-57, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    20. Stephen Malpezzi, "undated". "Local Economic Development and Its Finance: An Introduction," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 02-06, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
    21. Xiaobing Shuai, 2015. "Do Economic Development Efforts Benefit All? Business Attraction and Income Inequality," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1), pages 35-56, Spring.
    22. Wales, Philip, 2013. "Access all areas? The impact of fees and background on student demand for postgraduate higher education in the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57846, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    23. Xu, Xin, 2013. "The business cycle and health behaviors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 126-136.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    local economic development; urban jobs; job growth; labor demand; family income;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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