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State Fragility and Implications for Aid Allocation: An Empirical Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • David Carment

    (Country Indicators for Foreign Policy Project on Fragile States The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, david_carment@carleton.ca)

  • Yiagadeesen Samy

    (Country Indicators for Foreign Policy Project on Fragile States The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada)

  • Stewart Prest

    (Country Indicators for Foreign Policy Project on Fragile States The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada)

Abstract

In recent years, state fragility has gained importance as a result of the perceived links between poverty, conflict, and global terrorism. In this paper, we examine the relationship between state fragility and aid by evaluating the literature and research programs currently extant. We bring conceptual clarity to the issue by developing and testing an alternative theoretical framework using CIFP's fragility index (articulated around the concepts of authority, legitimacy, and capacity [ALC]) and by using data collected for the period 1999—2005 to identify the empirical determinants of fragility. We then examine the effects of state fragility on aid allocation, using the ALC framework as defined. Our results indicate that aid allocation is directed toward states on the basis of their capacity and authority scores and not on the basis of their legitimacy scores. Finally, we assess the theoretical and policy implications of these findings and specify directions for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • David Carment & Yiagadeesen Samy & Stewart Prest, 2008. "State Fragility and Implications for Aid Allocation: An Empirical Analysis," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 25(4), pages 349-373, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:25:y:2008:i:4:p:349-373
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nelli Babayan, 2016. "A Global Trend EU-style: Democracy Promotion in ‘Fragile’ and Conflict-Affected South Caucasus," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(2), pages 217-226, May.
    2. Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Remy Bolito-Losembe, 2014. "Corruption et Etats fragiles africains," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 50-58.
    3. Yiagadeesen Samy & David Carment, 2019. "Aid Targeting to Fragile and Conflict-Affected States and Implications for Aid Effectiveness," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 7(2), pages 93-102.
    4. Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Asongu Simplice, 2016. "State fragility, rent seeking and lobbying: evidence from African data," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(10), pages 1016-1030, October.
    5. repec:spr:qualqt:v:53:y:2019:i:6:d:10.1007_s11135-019-00905-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Guillaumont, Patrick & McGillivray, Mark & Wagner, Laurent, 2017. "Performance Assessment, Vulnerability, Human Capital, and the Allocation of Aid Among Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 17-26.
    7. Ahmed, Vaqar & Wahab Siddiqui, Abdul, 2010. "Nexus between aid and security: the case of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 29310, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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