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Managing the Accessibility on Mass Public Transit: the Case of Hong Kong

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Listed:
  • Lo, Hong K

    () (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Hong Kong)

  • Tang, Siman

    (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Hong Kong)

  • Wang, David Z.W.

    (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Hong Kong)

Abstract

Public transit services (PTS) improve mobility and accessibility, and reduce car dependence. It is ideal if PTS are financially sustainable, with affordable fares and expedient quality. The success of PTS on accessibility improvement can be reflected by their level of patronage: do travelers choose to use them in lieu of their private cars? PTS in Hong Kong are renowned for their quality and profitability, superbly addressing the accessibility need for the city; they carry over 90% of the 11 million daily trips. A comparison of the per capita train-car and bus-vehicle kilometer run of PTS in Hong Kong with those in London and Singapore, however, suggests that it is not purely the supply that affects the use or accessibility of PTS in Hong Kong. By tracing and analyzing the development of PTS in Hong Kong over the past two decades, we found evidence that the high level of accessibility on mass public transit in the territory can be attributed to the land use policy of developing compact, high-density township, accompanying transport policies of granting high priority to the development of mass transit facilities and providing ways to ensure the financial viability of privately operated PTS, especially the innovative approach of integrating the development of public transport facility and property so as to exploit their synergy. In this paper, we study and highlight elements that contribute to the development of high accessibility on mass public transit in Hong Kong.

Suggested Citation

  • Lo, Hong K & Tang, Siman & Wang, David Z.W., 2008. "Managing the Accessibility on Mass Public Transit: the Case of Hong Kong," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 1(2), pages 23-49.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:jtralu:0009
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Laurent Denant-Boemont & Gordon Mills, 1999. "Urban light rail: Intermodal competition or coordination?," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 241-253, January.
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    3. Kenworthy, Jeffrey R. & Laube, Felix B., 1999. "Patterns of automobile dependence in cities: an international overview of key physical and economic dimensions with some implications for urban policy," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 33(7-8), pages 691-723.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Levinson, David M & Krizek, Kevin, 2008. "From the Editors," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 1(2), pages 1-3.
    2. MA, Xiaosu & LO, Hong K., 2013. "On joint railway and housing development strategy," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 451-467.
    3. Murakami, Jin, 2010. "The Transit-Oriented Global Centers for Competitiveness and Livability: State Strategies and Market Responses in Asia," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt19034785, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Wang, David Z.W. & Lo, Hong K., 2016. "Financial sustainability of rail transit service: The effect of urban development pattern," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 23-33.
    5. Murakami, Jin, 2010. "The Transit-Oriented Global Centers for Competitiveness and Livability: State Strategies and Market Responses in Asia," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt44g9t8mj, University of California Transportation Center.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General

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