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The impact of public transport policy on the viability and sustainability of mass railway transit - The Hong Kong experience

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  • Tang, Siman
  • Lo, Hong K.

Abstract

Mass transit railway projects are often a top contender to meet the rapidly increasing travel demand, especially in many Asian cities. The experience of Hong Kong, with a system of highly reputable public transport services, reveals that the viability and sustainability of mass transit railways depend very much on accompanying transport policies and land development strategies. The priority given to public transport and control on the growth of private cars, among others, have laid the foundation for success in Hong Kong over the past quarter of century. However, the recent shift in transport policy, from emphasizing an integrated public transport system to relaxing the regulations on modal competition, has resulted in an indiscriminate expansion or oversupply of bus and rail services, especially along congested or profitable corridors. Other than creating a difficult operating environment for the operators, road congestion and the burden to expand the roadway infrastructure in order to keep up with congestion are other negative externalities. It is, therefore, imperative that mass transit railway projects are planned with accompanying long-term transport policies to ensure their viability and sustainability.

Suggested Citation

  • Tang, Siman & Lo, Hong K., 2008. "The impact of public transport policy on the viability and sustainability of mass railway transit - The Hong Kong experience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 563-576, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:42:y:2008:i:4:p:563-576
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    Cited by:

    1. Bajada, Thérèse & Titheridge, Helena, 2016. "To contract or to operate publicly? Observations from the bus service reform transition process in Malta," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 281-291.
    2. Zhang, Zheng & Fujii, Hidemichi & Managi, Shunsuke, 2014. "How does Commuting Behavior Change Due to Incentives? An Empirical Study of the Beijing Subway System," MPRA Paper 54691, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. MA, Xiaosu & LO, Hong K., 2013. "On joint railway and housing development strategy," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 451-467.
    4. Lindsey, Marshall & Schofer, Joseph L. & Durango-Cohen, Pablo & Gray, Kimberly A., 2010. "Relationship between proximity to transit and ridership for journey-to-work trips in Chicago," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(9), pages 697-709, November.
    5. repec:eee:transa:v:105:y:2017:i:c:p:106-122 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Lefèvre, Benoit, 2009. "Long-term energy consumptions of urban transportation: A prospective simulation of "transport-land uses" policies in Bangalore," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 940-953, March.

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