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Migration Impact Assessment: A Review of Evidence-Based Findings

Listed author(s):
  • Peter Nijkamp

    (Department of Spatial Economics, VU University Amsterdam A. Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

This paper aims to introduce Migration Impact Assessment (MIA) as a new methodological tool to estimate the socio-economic impacts of migrants on local, regional or national economies. Two approaches are presented here, viz. empirical macro studies and meta-analytical studies. The overall results suggest a modestly positive impact of migration on the economies of host countries or regions.

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Article provided by Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis in its journal Review of Economic Analysis.

Volume (Year): 4 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (December)
Pages: 179-208

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Handle: RePEc:ren:journl:v:4:y:2012:i:2:p:179-208
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  1. Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot & Mediha Sahin (ed.), 2012. "Migration Impact Assessment," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14476.
  2. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2011. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-32, Spring.
  3. Hans Roodenburg & Rob Euwals & Harry ter Rele, 2003. "Immigration and the Dutch economy," CPB Special Publication 47, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  4. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Caroline Halls, 2010. "Assessing the Fiscal Costs and Benefits of A8 Migration to the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 31(1), pages 1-41, 03.
  5. Barro, Robert T. & Sala-I-Martin, Xavier, 1992. "Regional growth and migration: A Japan-United States comparison," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 312-346, December.
  6. Münz, Rainer & Straubhaar, Thomas & Vadean, Florin P. & Vadean, Nadia, 2006. "The costs and benefits of European immigration," HWWI Policy Reports 3, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  7. Ray Barrell & John Fitzgerald & Rebecca Riley, 2010. "EU Enlargement and Migration: Assessing the Macroeconomic Impacts," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48, pages 373-395, 03.
  8. Ceren Ozgen & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2010. "The effect of migration on income growth and convergence: Meta-analytic evidence," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(3), pages 537-561, 08.
  9. Jens Suedekum & Katja Wolf & Uwe Blien, 2014. "Cultural Diversity and Local Labour Markets," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 173-191, January.
  10. Greenwood, Michael J & McDowell, John M, 1986. "The Factor Market Consequences of U.S. Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 1738-1772, December.
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