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Migration Impact Assessment: A Review of Evidence-Based Findings

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  • Peter Nijkamp

    (Department of Spatial Economics, VU University Amsterdam A. Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Abstract

This paper aims to introduce Migration Impact Assessment (MIA) as a new methodological tool to estimate the socio-economic impacts of migrants on local, regional or national economies. Two approaches are presented here, viz. empirical macro studies and meta-analytical studies. The overall results suggest a modestly positive impact of migration on the economies of host countries or regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "Migration Impact Assessment: A Review of Evidence-Based Findings," Review of Economic Analysis, Digital Initiatives at the University of Waterloo Library, vol. 4(2), pages 179-208, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ren:journl:v:4:y:2012:i:2:p:179-208
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2011. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-32, Spring.
    2. Hans Roodenburg & Rob Euwals & Harry ter Rele, 2003. "Immigration and the Dutch economy," CPB Special Publication 47, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Caroline Halls, 2010. "Assessing the Fiscal Costs and Benefits of A8 Migration to the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 31(1), pages 1-41, March.
    4. Ray Barrell & John Fitzgerald & Rebecca Riley, 2010. "EU Enlargement and Migration: Assessing the Macroeconomic Impacts," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 373-395, March.
    5. Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot & Mediha Sahin (ed.), 2012. "Migration Impact Assessment," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14476.
    6. Greenwood, Michael J & McDowell, John M, 1986. "The Factor Market Consequences of U.S. Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 1738-1772, December.
    7. Jens Suedekum & Katja Wolf & Uwe Blien, 2014. "Cultural Diversity and Local Labour Markets," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 173-191, January.
    8. Barro, Robert T. & Sala-I-Martin, Xavier, 1992. "Regional growth and migration: A Japan-United States comparison," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 312-346, December.
    9. Münz, Rainer & Straubhaar, Thomas & Vadean, Florin P. & Vadean, Nadia, 2006. "The costs and benefits of European immigration," HWWI Policy Reports 3, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    10. Ceren Ozgen & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2010. "The effect of migration on income growth and convergence: Meta‐analytic evidence," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(3), pages 537-561, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shaojun Liu & Ling Zhang & Yi Long, 2019. "Urban Vitality Area Identification and Pattern Analysis from the Perspective of Time and Space Fusion," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(15), pages 1-27, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration impact assessment; meta-analysis; diversity; labour market; wages; employment; convergence;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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