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The costs and benefits of European immigration

Author

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  • Münz, Rainer
  • Straubhaar, Thomas
  • Vadean, Florin P.
  • Vadean, Nadia

Abstract

In the early 21st century Europe is confronted with an ageing population, stagnating or even declining native populations, high unemployment and in the most key countries also with slow economic growth. At the same time Europe remains one of the prime destinations of international migration. Free movement of people is a means of creating an integrated Europe. Geographic mobility also helps on establishing a more efficient labour market, to the long-term benefit of workers, employers, taxpayers and EU Member States. Thus, our paper quantifies current migration patterns (see pp. 14-15); it recollects theoretical (see pp. 16-27) and empirical arguments (see pp. 28-47) on why immigration is so important, to what extent labour mobility allows individuals to improve their job prospects and employers to recruit people with adequate skills. The paper also discusses what kind of common European policies should be undertaken to optimise benefits of international migration. All our findings might not only avail understanding the economic impact of immigration. But they have policy implications for migrant receiving countries in Europe as well. The aim is to develop a better understanding of how the EU and its Member States could use availability and skills of today's and future immigrant populations in order to cope with economic and demographic challenges.

Suggested Citation

  • Münz, Rainer & Straubhaar, Thomas & Vadean, Florin P. & Vadean, Nadia, 2006. "The costs and benefits of European immigration," HWWI Policy Reports 3, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwipr:3
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tanja El-Cherkeh & Max Steinhardt & Thomas Straubhaar, 2006. "Did the European Free Movement of Persons and Residence Directive Change Migration Patterns within the EU? A First Glance," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 4(4), pages 14-20, 02.
    2. Masood Gheasi & Peter Nijkamp & Piet Rietveld, 2013. "Migration and foreign direct investment: education matters," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(1), pages 73-87, August.
    3. Münz, Rainer & Straubhaar, Thomas & Vadean, Florin P. & Vadean, Nadia, 2007. "What are the migrants' contributions to employment and growth? A European approach," HWWI Policy Papers 3-3, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    4. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri, 2016. "Rethinking The Effect Of Immigration On Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 2, pages 35-80 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Bakens, J. & Nijkamp, P., 2011. "Lessons from migration impact analysis," Serie Research Memoranda 0022, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    6. Matthias Busse & Steffen Gröning, 2013. "The resource curse revisited: governance and natural resources," Public Choice, Springer, pages 1-20.
    7. William Betz & Nicole Simpson, 2013. "The effects of international migration on the well-being of native populations in Europe," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-21, December.
    8. Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "Migration Impact Assessment: A Review of Evidence-Based Findings," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 4(2), pages 179-208, December.
    9. Bakens, J. & Nijkamp, P., 2011. "Migrant heterogeneity and urban development: A conceptual analysis," Serie Research Memoranda 0046, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    10. d'Artis Kancs & Patrizio Lecca, 2016. "Long-term social, economic and fiscal effects of immigration into the EU: The role of the integration policy," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2016/08, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    11. Hamori, Szilvia, 2009. "Employment convergence of immigrants in the EU: Differences across genders, regions of origin and destination," HWWI Research Papers 3-20, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).

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