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Skills and remittances: The case of Afghan, Egyptian, and Serbian immigrants in Germany

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  • Vadean, Florin P.

Abstract

The issue of migration and development became in the last years highly relevant on the global policy agenda. Countries and international organisations increasingly perceive migration as a phenomenon that can positively impact development in both migrant receiving and sending countries, provided that appropriate policies are in place. And one of the central issues within the context of the migration and development nexus is the role of the migrants' remittances as a source of capital and possible engine for economic growth in developing countries. The migrants' remittances gained in importance on the international agenda1 because of the dramatic rise in international flows. Between 2001 and 2005 international migrant remittances' flows increased by 58%, to reach about US$232 billion (The World Bank, 2005). With about US$167 billion, developing countries received the biggest share, while industrial countries in North America and Western Europe are the major sources. However, there is still limited knowledge about the way in which these international transfers effect economic development in the migrant sending counties.

Suggested Citation

  • Vadean, Florin P., 2007. "Skills and remittances: The case of Afghan, Egyptian, and Serbian immigrants in Germany," HWWI Research Papers 3-9, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwirp:3-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. DeVoretz, Don J. & Vadean, Florin, 2006. "Social Relations and Remittances: Evidence from Canadian Micro Data," IZA Discussion Papers 2501, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Giuliano, Paola & Ruiz-Arranz, Marta, 2009. "Remittances, financial development, and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 144-152, September.
    3. Adams, Richard H, Jr, 1998. "Remittances, Investment, and Rural Asset Accumulation in Pakistan," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(1), pages 155-173, October.
    4. Nicholas P. Glytsos, 1997. "Remitting Behaviour of "Temporary" and "Permanent" Migrants: The Case of Greeks in Germany and Australia," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 11(3), pages 409-435, November.
    5. Faini, Riccardo, 2006. "Remittances and the Brain Drain," IZA Discussion Papers 2155, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Robert E. B. Lucas, 2001. "Diaspora and Development: Highly Skilled Migrants from East Asia," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-120, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    7. Münz, Rainer & Straubhaar, Thomas & Vadean, Florin P. & Vadean, Nadia, 2006. "The costs and benefits of European immigration," HWWI Policy Reports 3, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    8. Glytsos, Nicholas P, 1993. "Measuring the Income Effects of Migrant Remittances: A Methodological Approach Applied to Greece," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(1), pages 131-168, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tolciu, Andreia & Schaland, Ann-Julia & El-Cherkeh, Tanja, 2010. "Migrant entrepreneurship in Hamburg: Results from a qualitative study with Turkish entrepreneurs," HWWI Research Papers 3-22, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration; remittances;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances

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