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Globalization and Inflation: Evidence from a Time Varying VAR

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco Bianchi

    (Duke University)

  • Andrea Civelli

    (University of Arkansas)

Abstract

According to the Globalization Hypothesis, global economic slack should progressively replace the domestic output gap in driving inflation as globalization increases. We investigate the empirical evidence in favor of this prediction by using a Time-varying VAR. Two main results emerge from the analysis: First, global slack is found to affect the dynamics of inflation in many countries, yet its influence did not become stronger over time. Second, a panel analysis that exploits the cross-section characteristics of our dataset shows that globalization, measured in terms of trade and financial openness, is positively related to the effects of global slack on inflation. We conclude that integration in the global economy is in fact important, but globalization has not yet induced changes in openness large enough to justify significant brakes in inflation dynamics. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Bianchi & Andrea Civelli, 2015. "Globalization and Inflation: Evidence from a Time Varying VAR," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 406-433, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:13-184
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2014.07.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Globalization; Inflation; Time-variation; VAR;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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