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Globalization, Domestic Inflation and Global Output Gaps: Evidence from the Euro Area

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  • Alessandro Calza

Abstract

This paper tests whether the proposition that globalization has led to greater sensitivity of domestic inflation to the global output gap (the 'global output gap hypothesis') holds for the euro area. The empirical analysis uses quarterly data over the period 1979-2003. Measures of the global output gap using two different weighting schemes (based on purchasing power parities and trade data) are considered. We find limited evidence that global capacity constraints have explanatory power for domestic consumer price inflation in the euro area. Based on these findings, the prescription that central banks should specifically react to developments in global output gaps does not seem to be justified for the euro area. Copyright 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Calza, 2009. "Globalization, Domestic Inflation and Global Output Gaps: Evidence from the Euro Area," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 301-320, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:intfin:v:12:y:2009:i:3:p:301-320
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    Cited by:

    1. Chengsi Zhang & Ke Song & Fang Wang, 2015. "Economic Globalization and Inflation in China: A Multivariate Approach," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 23(3), pages 79-96, May.
    2. Francesco Bianchi & Andrea Civelli, 2015. "Globalization and Inflation: Evidence from a Time Varying VAR," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 406-433, April.
    3. Abbas, Syed K. & Bhattacharya, Prasad Sankar & Sgro, Pasquale, 2016. "The new Keynesian Phillips curve: An update on recent empirical advances," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 378-403.
    4. Lewis, John & Saleheen, Jumana, 2014. "Tailwinds from the East: how has the rising share of imports from emerging markets affected import prices?," Bank of England working papers 506, Bank of England.
    5. Ahmad, Saad & Civelli, Andrea, 2016. "Globalization and inflation: A threshold investigation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 283-304.
    6. Qin, Duo & He, Xinhua, 2013. "Globalisation effect on inflation in the Great Moderation era: New evidence from G10 countries," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 7, pages 1-32.
    7. Tomislav Globan & Vladimir Arčabić & Petar Sorić, 2016. "Inflation in New EU Member States: A Domestically or Externally Driven Phenomenon?," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(1), pages 154-168, January.
    8. Carlos A. Medel & Michael Pedersen & Pablo M. Pincheira, 2016. "The Elusive Predictive Ability of Global Inflation," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(2), pages 120-146, June.
    9. Christian Dreger & Malte Rieth & David Pothier, 2015. "Is Globalization Reducing the Ability of Central Banks to Control Inflation? In-Depth Analysis," DIW Berlin: Politikberatung kompakt, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, volume 106, number pbk106.
    10. Malte Rieth, 2015. "Can Central Banks Successfully Lean against Global Headwinds?," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 88, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    11. Gantungalag Altansukh & Ralf Becker & George Bratsiotis & Denise R. Osborn, 2018. "Structural Breaks in International Inflation Linkages for OECD Countries," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 240, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    12. repec:jed:journl:v:42:y:2017:i:3:p:41-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:mes:emfitr:v:52:y:2016:i:3:p:625-638 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Zhang, Chengsi & Zhou, You, 2016. "The Global Slack Hypothesis: New Evidence from China," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 339-348.
    15. Gregor Schwerhoff & Mouhamadou Sy, 2014. "The Non-Monetary Side of the Global Disinflation," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 337-371, April.
    16. repec:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1207-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Juan Carlos Berganza & Pedro del Río & Fructuoso Borrallo, 2016. "Determinants and implications of low global inflation rates," Occasional Papers 1608, Banco de España;Occasional Papers Homepage.
    18. Tomislav Globan & Vladimir Arčabić & Petar Sorić, 2016. "Inflation in New EU Member States: A Domestically or Externally Driven Phenomenon?," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(1), pages 154-168, January.
    19. Chengsi Zhang & Huidong He, 2016. "Globalization and Changing Inflation Dynamics in China," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(3), pages 625-638, March.
    20. Pym Manopimoke & Wanicha Direkudomsak, 2015. "Thai Inflation Dynamics in a Globalized Economy," PIER Discussion Papers 11., Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Nov 2015.
    21. Çiçek, Serkan, 2012. "Globalization and flattening of Phillips Curve in Turkey between 1987 and 2007," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 1655-1661.

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