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Do Age and Experience Always Go Together? The Example of Indigenous Employment

Author

Listed:
  • Boyd Hunter

    (Australian National University)

  • Guyonne Kalb

    (University of Melbourne)

  • Trinh le

    (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

Abstract

Labour market experience is central to labour economics, however, it can be difficult to measure in cross-sectional surveys for groups who voluntarily or involuntarily spend prolonged periods outside the labour force (e.g. incarceration). This paper uses census data on the age profiles of employment since 1981 to estimate the experience that Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations could be expected to have conditional on their age. This estimate is then compared with survey information on experience to generate an estimate of inconsistency between measured and expected experience. The differential is very small for the non-Indigenous population, but survey estimates for Indigenous people are substantially higher than the relevant population-based estimates. It is possible that this finding reflects the fact that the composition of the Indigenous population has changed over time, differences in recall bias or even selective mortality with persons with a more substantial employment history surviving longer.

Suggested Citation

  • Boyd Hunter & Guyonne Kalb & Trinh le, 2014. "Do Age and Experience Always Go Together? The Example of Indigenous Employment," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 17(2), pages 67-85.
  • Handle: RePEc:ozl:journl:v:17:y:2014:i:2:p:67-85
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, March.
    2. Guyonne Kalb & Trinh Le & Boyd Hunter & Felix Leung, 2014. "Identifying Important Factors for Closing the Gap in Labour Force Status between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 90(291), pages 536-550, December.
    3. Nicholas Biddle & Monica Howlett & Boyd Hunter & Yin Paradies, 2013. "Labour market and other discrimination facing Indigenous Australians," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 16(1), pages 91-113.
    4. Mark Wooden & Nicole Watson, 2007. "The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 208-231, June.
    5. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling and Earnings," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 41-63, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Yoram Ben-Porath, 1967. "The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75, pages 352-352.
    7. Benjamin J. Stephens, 2010. "The Determinants of Labour Force Status among Indigenous Australians," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 13(3), pages 287-312.
    8. Benjamin J. Stephens, 2010. "The Determinants of Labour Force Status among Indigenous Australians," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 10-11, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    9. Jacob Mincer, 1958. "Investment in Human Capital and Personal Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 281-281.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Siddharth Shirodkar & Boyd Hunter, 2019. "Factors underlying the likelihood of being in business for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 22(1), pages 5-27.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Measuring employment experience; Indigenous Australians; remote labour market; labour market programs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J78 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Public Policy (including comparable worth)

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