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Foreign banks and foreign currency lending in emerging Europe
[Capital structure and financial risk: evidence from foreign debt use in East Asia]

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  • Martin Brown
  • Ralph De Haas

Abstract

Based on survey data from 193 banks in 20 countries we provide the first bank-level analysis of the relationship between bank ownership, bank funding and foreign currency (FX) lending across emerging Europe. Our results contradict the widespread view that foreign banks have been driving FX lending to retail clients as a result of easier access to foreign wholesale funding. Our cross-sectional analysis shows that foreign banks do lend more in FX to corporate clients but not to households. Moreover, we find no evidence that wholesale funding had a strong causal effect on FX lending for either foreign or domestic banks. Panel estimations show that the foreign acquisition of a domestic bank does lead to faster growth in FX lending to households. However, this is driven by faster growth in household lending in general not by a shift towards FX lending.— Martin Brown and Ralph De Haas

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Brown & Ralph De Haas, 2012. "Foreign banks and foreign currency lending in emerging Europe [Capital structure and financial risk: evidence from foreign debt use in East Asia]," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(69), pages 57-98.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecpoli:v:27:y:2012:i:69:p:57-98.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0327.2011.00277.x
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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