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Does Regulation of Manure Land Application Work Against Agglomeration Economies? Theory and Evidence from the French Hog Sector


  • Carl Gaigné
  • Julie Le Gallo
  • Solène Larue
  • Bertrand Schmitt


We examine whether the restrictions on manure land application weaken productivity gains arising from agglomeration in the hog sector. By developing a spatial model of production, we show that while regulating the manure application rate promotes dispersion ceteris paribus, it also prompts farmers to adopt systems of manure treatment that favor the agglomeration of hog production. We estimate a reduced form of the model with a spatial HAC procedure from French data. Our results suggest that land limitations induced by the restrictions on manure application do not favor the dispersion of hog production, and may boost agglomeration economies related to non-market spatial externalities. Copyright 2012, Oxford University Press.

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  • Carl Gaigné & Julie Le Gallo & Solène Larue & Bertrand Schmitt, 2012. "Does Regulation of Manure Land Application Work Against Agglomeration Economies? Theory and Evidence from the French Hog Sector," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 94(1), pages 116-132.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:94:y:2012:i:1:p:116-132

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sabine Duvaleix-Tréguer & Carl Gaigné, 2016. "On the nature and magnitude of cost economies in hog production," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 47(4), pages 465-476, July.
    2. Carpentier, Alain & Gohin, Alexandre & Sckokai, Paolo & Thomas, Alban, 2015. "Economic modelling of agricultural production: past advances and new challenges," Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, Editions NecPlus, vol. 96(01), pages 131-165, March.
    3. Fertő, Imre & Csonka, Arnold, 2017. "Válság- és agglomerációs hatások a magyarországi sertéstartásban
      [Crisis and agglomeration in Hungary s pig production]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 105-122.
    4. Abay Mulatu & Ada Wossink, 2014. "Environmental Regulation and Location of Industrialized Agricultural Production in Europe," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 90(3), pages 509-537.
    5. Csonka, Arnold & Fertő, Imre, 2016. "Crisis and Agglomeration in the Hungarian Hog Sector," 149th Seminar, October 27-28, 2016, Rennes, France 244787, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Duvaleix-Treguer, Sabine & Gaigne, Carl, 2012. "Cost Economies in Hog Production: Feed prices matter," Working Papers 125261, Structure and Performance of Agriculture and Agri-products Industry (SPAA).

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