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Determinants of Income Growth in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Labor Markets

  • George W. Hammond
  • Eric C. Thompson

This article analyzes determinants of growth across labor markets in the United States, using a production function approach based on four inputs: labor, manufacturing investment, human capital investment, and public capital investment. We find little role for public capital investment in growth, but that manufacturing investment spurred growth in nonmetropolitan areas, in contrast to metropolitan areas. We also find that human capital investment mattered more for metropolitan areas than for nonmetropolitan areas. Further, the presence of more colleges and universities, more household amenities, and lower tax rates are all found to have encouraged human capital accumulation in U.S. labor markets. Copyright 2008, Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2008.01135.x
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Article provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its journal American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 90 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 783-793

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:90:y:2008:i:3:p:783-793
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  1. James E. Rauch, 1991. "Productivity Gains From Geographic Concentration of human Capital: Evidence From the Cities," NBER Working Papers 3905, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Duffy, John & Papageorgiou, Chris, 2000. " A Cross-Country Empirical Investigation of the Aggregate Production Function Specification," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 87-120, March.
  3. Anil Rupasingha & Stephan J. Goetz & David Freshwater, 2002. "Social and institutional factors as determinants of economic growth: Evidence from the United States counties," Papers in Regional Science, Springer, vol. 81(2), pages 139-155.
  4. George W. Hammond & Eric Thompson, 2006. "Determinants of Income Growth in U.S. Metropolitan and Non-metropolitan Labor Markets," Working Papers 06-12 Classification- JEL, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  5. Kwang-Koo Kim & David W. Marcouiller & Steven C. Deller, 2005. "Natural Amenities and Rural Development: Understanding Spatial and Distributional Attributes," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 273-297.
  6. Steven C. Deller & Martin Shields & David Tomberlin, 1996. "Price Differentials And Trends In State Income Levels: A Research Note," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 26(1), pages 99-113, Summer.
  7. Edward L. Glaeser & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1995. "Economic Growth in a Cross-Section of Cities," NBER Working Papers 5013, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. George Hammond, 2006. "A time series analysis of U.S. metropolitan and non-metropolitan income divergence," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 81-94, March.
  9. Winford H. Masanjala & Chris Papageorgiou, 2004. "The Solow model with CES technology: nonlinearities and parameter heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 171-201.
  10. Simon, Curtis J., 1998. "Human Capital and Metropolitan Employment Growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 223-243, March.
  11. Steven C. Deller & Tsung-Hsiu (Sue) Tsai & David W. Marcouiller & Donald B.K. English, 2001. "The Role of Amenities and Quality of Life In Rural Economic Growth," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(2), pages 352-365.
  12. Carlino, Gerald A. & Mills, Leonard O., 1993. "Are U.S. regional incomes converging? : A time series analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 335-346, November.
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