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Determinants of Income Growth in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Labor Markets

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  • George W. Hammond
  • Eric C. Thompson

Abstract

This article analyzes determinants of growth across labor markets in the United States, using a production function approach based on four inputs: labor, manufacturing investment, human capital investment, and public capital investment. We find little role for public capital investment in growth, but that manufacturing investment spurred growth in nonmetropolitan areas, in contrast to metropolitan areas. We also find that human capital investment mattered more for metropolitan areas than for nonmetropolitan areas. Further, the presence of more colleges and universities, more household amenities, and lower tax rates are all found to have encouraged human capital accumulation in U.S. labor markets. Copyright 2008, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • George W. Hammond & Eric C. Thompson, 2008. "Determinants of Income Growth in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Labor Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(3), pages 783-793.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:90:y:2008:i:3:p:783-793
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2008.01135.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Glaeser, Edward L. & Scheinkman, JoseA. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1995. "Economic growth in a cross-section of cities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 117-143, August.
    2. Kwang-Koo Kim & David W. Marcouiller & Steven C. Deller, 2005. "Natural Amenities and Rural Development: Understanding Spatial and Distributional Attributes," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 273-297.
    3. Rauch James E., 1993. "Productivity Gains from Geographic Concentration of Human Capital: Evidence from the Cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 380-400, November.
    4. Winford H. Masanjala & Chris Papageorgiou, 2004. "The Solow model with CES technology: nonlinearities and parameter heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 171-201.
    5. Anil Rupasingha & Stephan J. Goetz & David Freshwater, 2002. "Social and institutional factors as determinants of economic growth: Evidence from the United States counties," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 81(2), pages 139-155, April.
    6. Steven C. Deller & Martin Shields & David Tomberlin, 1996. "Price Differentials And Trends In State Income Levels: A Research Note," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 26(1), pages 99-113, Summer.
    7. George W. Hammond & Eric Thompson, 2006. "Determinants of Income Growth in U.S. Metropolitan and Non-metropolitan Labor Markets," Working Papers 06-12 Classification- JEL, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    8. George Hammond, 2006. "A time series analysis of U.S. metropolitan and non-metropolitan income divergence," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1), pages 81-94, March.
    9. repec:hoo:wpaper:e-95-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Steven C. Deller & Tsung-Hsiu (Sue) Tsai & David W. Marcouiller & Donald B.K. English, 2001. "The Role of Amenities and Quality of Life In Rural Economic Growth," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(2), pages 352-365.
    11. Duffy, John & Papageorgiou, Chris, 2000. "A Cross-Country Empirical Investigation of the Aggregate Production Function Specification," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 87-120, March.
    12. Carlino, Gerald A. & Mills, Leonard O., 1993. "Are U.S. regional incomes converging? : A time series analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 335-346, November.
    13. Simon, Curtis J., 1998. "Human Capital and Metropolitan Employment Growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 223-243, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Butters, Roger & Thompson, Eric C. & Zheng, Ziwen, 2012. "Destination Choices of Michigan Micropolitan Outmigrants: Key Determinants and Implications for Community Marketing," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 42(1).
    2. George W. Hammond & Mehmet S. Tosun, 2011. "The Impact Of Local Decentralization On Economic Growth: Evidence From U.S. Counties," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 47-64, February.
    3. Devin Bunten & Stephan Weiler & Eric Thompson & Sammy Zahran, 2015. "Entrepreneurship, Information, And Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 560-584, September.
    4. Jin, Jangik & Rafferty, Peter, 2017. "Does congestion negatively affect income growth and employment growth? Empirical evidence from US metropolitan regions," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 1-8.

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