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Destination Choices of Michigan Micropolitan Outmigrants: Key Determinants and Implications for Community Marketing

  • Butters, Roger
  • Thompson, Eric C.
  • Zheng, Ziwen
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    As its economy struggled during the last decade, Michigan became the only state to lose population between the 2000 and 2010 Censuses. Michigan’s problems were well known and communities in other states sought to attract residents from Michigan. This paper describes the efforts of one Nebraska community, Columbus, to recruit residents from a specific Michi-gan micropolitan area. We also develop a model of destination choice by outmigrants from Michigan micropolitan areas. We find that counties that offer amenity and real wage ad-vantages have the greatest potential to attract Michigan outmigrants, that differences in un-employment rates do not influence destination choice, and that the potential for attracting workers drops with distance.

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    Article provided by Mid-Continent Regional Science Association in its journal Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy.

    Volume (Year): 42 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:143763
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    1. Cushing, Brian J, 1986. "Accounting for Spatial Relationships in Models of Interstate Population Migration," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 66-73, July.
    2. George W. Hammond & Eric C. Thompson, 2008. "Determinants of Income Growth in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Labor Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(3), pages 783-793.
    3. Greenwood, Michael J, 1969. "An Analysis of the Determinants of Geographic Labor Mobility in the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(2), pages 189-94, May.
    4. Gunderson, Ronald J. & Sorenson, David J., 2010. "An Examination of Domestic Migration from California Counties," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1).
    5. Watkins, Tate & Yandle, Bruce, 2010. "Can Freedom and Knowledge Economy Indexes Explain Go-Getter Migration Patterns?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(2).
    6. Mark Partridge & Ray D. Bollman & M. Rose Olfert & Alessandro Alasia, 2007. "Riding the Wave of Urban Growth in the Countryside: Spread, Backwash, or Stagnation?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(2), pages 128-152.
    7. Rappaport, Jordan, 2004. "Why are population flows so persistent?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 554-580, November.
    8. Cebula, Richard J. & Alexander, Gigi M., 2006. "Determinants of Net Interstate Migration, 2000-2004," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2).
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