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Measuring core inflation

  • Rachel Holden

    (Reserve Bank of New Zealand)

Registered author(s):

    Under the Policy Targets Agreement, the Reserve Bank is required to keep future CPI inflation outcomes between 1 percent and 3 percent on average over the medium term. The headline CPI inflation rate provides some information on the strength of current and future inflation pressures, but can often be clouded by temporary fluctuations. Core inflation measures attempt to abstract from these temporary fluctuations to better inform us of the underlying trends in inflation. This article outlines a number of criteria that can be used to assess the relative merits of possible measures of core inflation. It then analyses a range of alternative core inflation measures against these criteria and draws some conclusions as to which measures might best serve as core inflation indicators in New Zealand.

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    Article provided by Reserve Bank of New Zealand in its journal Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): 69 (2006)
    Issue (Month): (December)
    Pages: 7p

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    Handle: RePEc:nzb:nzbbul:december2006:2
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    1. Cogley, Timothy, 2002. "A Simple Adaptive Measure of Core Inflation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(1), pages 94-113, February.
    2. George Kapetanios, 2002. "Modelling Core Inflation for the UK Using a New Dynamic Factor Estimation Method and a Large Disaggregated Price Index Dataset," Working Papers 471, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Riccardo Cristadoro & Mario Forni & Lucrezia Reichlin & Giovanni Veronese, 2005. "A core inflation indicator for the Euro area," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10131, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. Quah, Danny, 1995. "Measuring Core Inflation," CEPR Discussion Papers 1153, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Domenico Giannone & Troy D. Matheson, 2007. "A New Core Inflation Indicator for New Zealand," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 3(4), pages 145-180, December.
    6. Kapetanios, George, 2004. "A note on modelling core inflation for the UK using a new dynamic factor estimation method and a large disaggregated price index dataset," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 63-69, October.
    7. Danny Quah & Danny Quah & Shaun P. Vahey, 1995. "Measuring Core Inflation," CEP Discussion Papers dp0254, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. Robert Dixon & Guay Lim, 2003. "Underlying Inflation in Australia: Are the Existing Measures Satisfactory?," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 878, The University of Melbourne.
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