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What neighborhood are you in? Empirical findings of relationships between household travel and neighborhood characteristics

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  • Jie Lin

    ()

  • Liang Long

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Jie Lin & Liang Long, 2008. "What neighborhood are you in? Empirical findings of relationships between household travel and neighborhood characteristics," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(6), pages 739-758, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:35:y:2008:i:6:p:739-758
    DOI: 10.1007/s11116-008-9167-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bhat, Chandra R., 2000. "A multi-level cross-classified model for discrete response variables," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 567-582, September.
    2. Xinyu Cao & Patricia L Mokhtarian & Susan L Handy, 2007. "Cross-Sectional and Quasi-Panel Explorations of the Connection between the Built Environment and Auto Ownership," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 39(4), pages 830-847, April.
    3. Schwanen, Tim & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "What if You Live in the Wrong Neighborhood? The Impact of Residential Neighborhood Type Dissonance on Distance Traveled," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5hh713d6, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Patricia L. Mokhtarian & Michael N. Bagley, 2002. "The impact of residential neighborhood type on travel behavior: A structural equations modeling approach," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2), pages 279-297.
    5. Crane, Randall & Crepeau, Richard, 1998. "Does Neighborhood Design Influence Travel?: Behavioral Analysis of Travel Diary and GIS Data," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4pj4s7t8, University of California Transportation Center.
    6. Nunes Amaral, Luís A & Buldyrev, Sergey V & Havlin, Shlomo & Maass, Philipp & Salinger, Michael A & Eugene Stanley, H & Stanley, Michael H.R, 1997. "Scaling behavior in economics: The problem of quantifying company growth," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 244(1), pages 1-24.
    7. Goodman, Allen C. & Thibodeau, Thomas G., 1998. "Housing Market Segmentation," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 121-143, June.
    8. Xinyu Cao & Susan Handy & Patricia Mokhtarian, 2006. "The Influences of the Built Environment and Residential Self-Selection on Pedestrian Behavior: Evidence from Austin, TX," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 1-20, January.
    9. Burgess Jr., James F. & Christiansen, Cindy L. & Michalak, Sarah E. & Morris, Carl N., 2000. "Medical profiling: improving standards and risk adjustments using hierarchical models," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 291-309, May.
    10. Khattak, Asad J. & Rodriguez, Daniel, 2005. "Travel behavior in neo-traditional neighborhood developments: A case study in USA," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 481-500, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yi Zhang & Xiaoguang Yang & Qixing Liu & Chaoyang Li, 2015. "Who Will Use Pre-Trip Traveler Information and How Will They Respond? Insights from Zhongshan Metropolitan Area, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(5), pages 1-18, May.
    2. Seyed Amir H. Zahabi & Luis Miranda-Moreno & Zachary Patterson & Philippe Barla, 2017. "Impacts of built environment and emerging green technologies on daily transportation greenhouse gas emissions in Quebec cities: a disaggregate modeling approach," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 159-180, January.
    3. Yi Zhang & Wei Wu & Yuan Li & Qixing Liu & Chaoyang Li, 2014. "Does the Built Environment Make a Difference? An Investigation of Household Vehicle Use in Zhongshan Metropolitan Area, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(8), pages 1-21, August.
    4. Kotval-K, Zeenat & Vojnovic, Igor, 2016. "A socio-ecological exploration into urban form: The environmental costs of travel," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 87-98.

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