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Entrepreneurs from low-skilled immigrant groups in knowledge-intensive industries: company characteristics, survival and innovative performance

Listed author(s):
  • Elisabeth Mueller

    ()

This paper analyzes how companies of immigrant entrepreneurs in knowledge-intensive industries differ from companies of native entrepreneurs with respect to start-up characteristics, company survival and innovative performance. I focus on immigrants from the “recruitment countries” of south and southeast Europe, who arrived in Germany mainly in the 1970s to fill labor shortages. They are the largest immigrant group in Germany and can be reliably identified via ethnic name coding. Companies owned exclusively by immigrants tend to be smaller and have higher exit rates. After controlling for size and other company characteristics, I find no differences in patenting activity compared to companies owned exclusively by natives. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11187-013-9498-4
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Small Business Economics.

Volume (Year): 42 (2014)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 871-889

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Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:42:y:2014:i:4:p:871-889
DOI: 10.1007/s11187-013-9498-4
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