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Factors Affecting Self-Employment among Indian and Black Caribbean Men in Britain


  • Borooah, Vani K
  • Hart, Mark


The central issue addressed in this paper is encapsulated in the fact that many Indians, but relatively few black Caribbeans, are self-employed in Britain. This paper suggests two factors: first, black Caribbeans were 'ethnically disinclined' to enter business; second, they did not posses the attributes that were positively related to entering business. Using data from the 1991 Census, this paper pinpoints how much of the observed paucity of self-employed black males in Britain was use to ethnic disinclination and how much was due to attribute disadvantage. More generally, it points to the importance of harnessing attitudes to attributes for generating a high rate of entry into self-employment. In this context, the acquisition of 'social' attributes that relate to family formation, and the welding of the family into a cohesive economic unit, are at least as important as those attributes, like education, which relate purely to the individual. Copyright 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Borooah, Vani K & Hart, Mark, 1999. "Factors Affecting Self-Employment among Indian and Black Caribbean Men in Britain," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 111-129, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:13:y:1999:i:2:p:111-29

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cardone Riportella, Clara & Cazorla Papis, Leonardo, 2001. "New approaches to the analysis of the capital structure of SME's: empirical evidence from Spanish firms," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb011003, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ken Clark & Stephen Drinkwater, 2010. "Patterns of ethnic self-employment in time and space: evidence from British Census microdata," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 323-338, April.
    2. Amelie Constant & Klaus Zimmermann, 2006. "The Making of Entrepreneurs in Germany: Are Native Men and Immigrants Alike?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 279-300, April.
    3. Grilo, I. & Thurik, A.R., 2004. "Determinants Of Entrepreneurship In Europe," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2004-106-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    4. Tüzin Baycan-Levent & Peter Nijkamp, 2009. "Characteristics of migrant entrepreneurship in Europe," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 375-397, July.
    5. Ingrid Verheul & Andre van Stel & Roy Thurik, 2004. "Explaining female and male entrepreneurship across 29 countries," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2004-08, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
    6. Constant, Amelie F. & Shachmurove, Yochanan & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2003. "What Makes an Entrepreneur and Does It Pay? Native Men, Turks, and Other Migrants in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 940, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Sarah Brown & Lisa Farrell & Mark N. Harris & John G. Sessions, 2006. "Risk preference and employment contract type," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 849-863.
    8. Elisabeth Mueller, 2014. "Entrepreneurs from low-skilled immigrant groups in knowledge-intensive industries: company characteristics, survival and innovative performance," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 42(4), pages 871-889, April.
    9. Sarah Brown & Michael Dietrich & Aurora Ortiz & Karl Taylor, 2007. "Self-Employment and Risk Preference," Working Papers 2007008, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    10. Ruth Oyelere & Willie Belton, 2013. "Black–White gap in self-employment. Does intra-race heterogeneity exist?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 25-39, June.
    11. Roy Thurik & Sander Wennekers & Ingrid Verheul & David Audretsch, 2001. "An eclectic theory of entrepreneurship: policies, institutions and culture," Scales Research Reports H200012, EIM Business and Policy Research.
    12. Masurel, E. & Nijkamp, P., 2009. "The low participation of urban migrant entrepreneurs: reasons and perceptions of weak institutional embeddedness," Serie Research Memoranda 0040, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    13. Clark, Ken & Drinkwater, Stephen & Robinson, Catherine, 2015. "Self?Employment amongst Migrant Groups in England and Wales: New Evidence from Census Microdata," IZA Discussion Papers 9539, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Pablo Gluzmann & David Jaume & Leonardo Gasparini, 2012. "Decisiones laborales en América Latina: el caso de los emprendedores. Un estudio sobre la base de encuestas de hogares," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0137, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    15. Baycan Levent, Tuzin & Masurel, Enno & Nijkamp, Peter, 2002. "Entrepreneurial process and performance: the case of the Turkish female entrepreneurs in Amsterdam," ERSA conference papers ersa02p397, European Regional Science Association.
    16. Tüzin Baycan-Levent & Peter Nijkamp, 2010. "Migrant Entrepreneurship in a Diverse Europe: In Search of Sustainable Development," Chapters,in: The Sustainability of Cultural Diversity, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Masurel, E., 2008. "Local shopkeepers’ associations and ethnic minority entrepreneurs," Serie Research Memoranda 0016, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    18. Blanchflower, David G. & Shadforth, Chris, 2007. "Entrepreneurship in the UK," Foundations and Trends(R) in Entrepreneurship, now publishers, vol. 3(4), pages 257-364, July.
    19. Ken Clark & Stephen Drinkwater & Catherine Robinson, 2017. "Self-employment amongst migrant groups: new evidence from England and Wales," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1047-1069, April.
    20. Román, Concepción & Congregado, Emilio & Millán, José María, 2013. "Start-up incentives: Entrepreneurship policy or active labour market programme?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 151-175.
    21. Nijkamp, Peter & van Hemert, Patricia, 2007. "Going for Growth; a Theoretical and Policy Framework," Papers DYNREG14, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    22. Abdoulkadre Ado & Elie Chrysostome & Zhan Su, 2016. "Examining Adaptation Strategies Of Sub-Saharan African Immigrant Entrepreneurs In China: The Case Of Guangdong," Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship (JDE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 21(04), pages 1-25, December.

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