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Time with sons and daughters

  • Elisabeth Gugl

    ()

  • Linda Welling

    ()

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11150-011-9129-2
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

Volume (Year): 10 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 277-298

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Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:10:y:2012:i:2:p:277-298
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=109451

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  1. Shelly Lundberg & Elaina Rose, 1999. "The Effect of Sons and Daughters on Men's Labor Supply and Wages," Working Papers 0033, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  2. Connelly, Rachel & Kimmel, Jean, 2007. "Spousal Influences on Parents' Non-Market Time Choices," IZA Discussion Papers 2894, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Baccara, Mariagiovanna & Collard-Wexler, Allan & Felli, Leonardo & Yariv, Leeat, 2010. "Gender and Racial Biases: Evidence from Child Adoption," CEPR Discussion Papers 7647, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Claudia Olivetti & Barbara Petrongolo, 2005. "Unequal pay or unequal employment? A cross-country analysis of gender gaps," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2005-008, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  5. Lundberg, Shelly, 2005. "The Division of Labor by New Parents: Does Child Gender Matter?," IZA Discussion Papers 1787, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Martin Farnham & Lucie Schmidt & Purvi Sevak, 2011. "House Prices and Marital Stability," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 615-19, May.
  7. Tanaka, Ryuichi, 2008. "The gender-asymmetric effect of working mothers on children's education: Evidence from Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 586-604, December.
  8. Behrman, Jere R & Pollak, Robert A & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "Do Parents Favor Boys?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 27(1), pages 33-54, February.
  9. Elisabeth Gugl & Justin Leroux, 2009. "Share the Gain, Share the Pain? Almost Transferable Utility, Changes in Production Possibilities and Bargaining Solutions," Department Discussion Papers 0903, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
  10. Laura Giuliano, 2007. "The Demand for Sons or the Demand for Fathers? Understanding the Effects of Child Gender on Divorce Rates," Working Papers 0724, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  11. Levison Stanley Chiwaula & Ben M. Kaluwa, 2008. "Household consumption of infant foods in two low-income districts in Malawi," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(5), pages 686-697.
  12. Shelly J. Lundberg & Robert A. Pollak & Terence J. Wales, 1997. "Do Husbands and Wives Pool Their Resources? Evidence from the United Kingdom Child Benefit," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(3), pages 463-480.
  13. Gordon B. Dahl & Enrico Moretti, 2008. "The Demand for Sons," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1085-1120.
  14. Joseph Price, 2008. "Parent-Child Quality Time: Does Birth Order Matter?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(1).
  15. Shelly Lundberg, 2005. "Sons, Daughters, and Parental Behaviour," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 340-356, Autumn.
  16. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Nina Smith & Mette Verner, 2008. "PERSPECTIVE ARTICLE: The impact of Nordic countries’ family friendly policies on employment, wages, and children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 65-89, March.
  17. Elisabeth Gugl & Linda Welling, 2010. "The Early Bird Gets The Worm? Birth Order Effects In A Dynamic Family Model," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(3), pages 690-703, 07.
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