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Determinants of congressional minimum wage support: the role of economic education

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  • J. O’Roark

    ()

  • William Wood

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • J. O’Roark & William Wood, 2011. "Determinants of congressional minimum wage support: the role of economic education," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 209-225, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:147:y:2011:i:1:p:209-225
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-010-9617-6
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-010-9617-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Neumark & Olena Nizalova, 2007. "Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
    2. Dougan, William R & Munger, Michael C, 1989. "The Rationality of Ideology," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(1), pages 119-142, April.
    3. Douglas Clement, 2006. "Interview with David Card," The Region, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Dec, pages 10-21.
    4. Stern, Charlotta & Klein, Daniel B., 2006. "Is There a Free-Market Economist in the House? The Policy Views of American Economic Association Members," Working Paper Series 6/2006, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    5. Edward J. López & Daniel Sutter, 2004. "Ignorance in Congressional Voting? Evidence from Policy Reversal on the Endangered Species Act," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(4), pages 891-912.
    6. John R. Lott & Jr. & Lawrence W. Kenny, 1999. "Did Women's Suffrage Change the Size and Scope of Government?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(6), pages 1163-1198, December.
    7. Russell S. Sobel, 1999. "Theory and Evidence on the Political Economy of the Minimum Wage," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(4), pages 761-785, August.
    8. Bryan Caplan, 2002. "Systematically Biased Beliefs About Economics: Robust Evidence of Judgemental Anomalies from the Survey of Americans and Economists on the Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(479), pages 433-458, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Osterloh, Steffen & Heinemann, Friedrich, 2013. "The political economy of corporate tax harmonization — Why do European politicians (dis)like minimum tax rates?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 18-37.
    2. Joshua Hall & Elham Erfanian & Caleb Stair, 2016. "Voting Behavior on Carbon Pollution from Power Plants," Working Papers 16-11, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    3. Moessinger, Marc-Daniel, 2012. "Do personal characteristics of finance ministers affect the development of public debt?," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-068, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. Joshua C. Hall & Chris Shultz, 2016. "Determinants of voting behaviour on the Keystone XL Pipeline," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(7), pages 498-500, May.
    5. Heinemann, Friedrich & Janeba, Eckhard & Moessinger, Marc-Daniel & Schröder, Christoph, 2013. "Revenue autonomy preference in German state parliaments," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-090, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    6. Marc-Daniel Moessinger, 2014. "Do the personal characteristics of finance ministers affect changes in public debt?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 161(1), pages 183-207, October.
    7. J. Brian O’Roark, 2012. "Economists in Congress: How Economic Education Motivates Votes on Free Trade in Congress," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 27(Spring 20), pages 83-101.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic education; Congressional voting behavior; Minimum wage; A20; D72; J38;

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy

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