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Ethnicity and Labor Market Incorporation of Post-1990 Immigrants in Israel

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  • Moshe Semyonov

    ()

  • Rebeca Raijman

    ()

  • Dina Maskileyson

    ()

Abstract

Using data from “The Immigrants Survey” we compare economic incorporation of four ethnic groups of immigrants who arrived to Israel between 1990 and 2007: Ethiopia, Western Europe and the Americas, Asia and North Africa, and the Former Soviet Union. Labor market incorporation is evaluated in terms of labor force participation, occupational attainment and earnings. The analysis reveals that regardless of ethnicity, when compared to native-born, immigrant women face greater disadvantages in the labor market than immigrant men. Further analysis reveals that immigrants from the Former Soviet Union are more likely to become economically active than the other groups; immigrants from Europe and the Americas have better access to high status occupations than do either immigrant Former Soviet Union or Asia and Africa and Ethiopia. Ethiopian immigrants are the most disadvantaged group in attainment of high status lucrative occupations and earnings. The findings point toward an ethnic hierarchy among post-1990 immigrants in Israel with European-Americans at the top, followed by Soviet immigrants, followed by immigrants from Asia–Africa and ending with Ethiopian immigrants at the bottom. The meaning of these findings for possibility of emergence of a more diversified and elaborated system of ethnic stratification is discussed in light of Israel’s immigration policy. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Moshe Semyonov & Rebeca Raijman & Dina Maskileyson, 2015. "Ethnicity and Labor Market Incorporation of Post-1990 Immigrants in Israel," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(3), pages 331-359, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:34:y:2015:i:3:p:331-359
    DOI: 10.1007/s11113-014-9345-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
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    8. Karin Amit, 2010. "Determinants of Life Satisfaction Among Immigrants from Western Countries and from the FSU in Israel," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(3), pages 515-534, May.
    9. Felix Büchel & Joachim R. Frick, 2004. "Immigrants in the UK and in West Germany –Relative income position, income portfolio, and redistribution effects," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 553-581, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:poprpr:v:37:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11113-017-9444-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:cysrev:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:319-328 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Chiswick, Barry R. & Rebhun, Uzi & Beider, Nadia, 2016. "Linguistic and Economic Adjustment among Immigrants in Israel," IZA Discussion Papers 10214, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    Keywords

    Immigration; Ethnicity; Labor market; Inequality; Israel;

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