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Inequality of Opportunity in Indian Children: The Case of Immunization and Nutrition

  • Ashish Singh

    ()

A child’s access to health care and minimum nutrition should not depend on circumstances such as caste, religion, gender, place of birth, or other parental characteristics, which are beyond the control of a child. This paper uses two rounds of Indian National Family Health Surveys and concepts of Inequality of Opportunity and Human Opportunity Indices to measure inequality arising out of unequal access to full immunization and minimum nutrition for Indian children. The results suggest overall high level of inequality of opportunity with substantial geographical variations. Changes in inequality of opportunity in the two services during 1992-93 to 2005-06 were mixed with some geographical regions outperforming others. The findings also call for substantial policy revisions if the goal of universal access to full immunization and minimum nutrition has to be achieved.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11113-011-9214-5
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Population Research and Policy Review.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 861-883

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Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:30:y:2011:i:6:p:861-883
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102983

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  15. repec:idb:brikps:60098 is not listed on IDEAS
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