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Reserve requirements, currency substitution, and seigniorage in the transition to European monetary union

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  • Joseph Daniels
  • David Hoose

Abstract

This article considers a transition toward European monetary union that combines increased substitution of currencies and greater monetary, financial, and fiscal policy coordination. It explores how such a transition would affect national inflation and interest rates and required reserve ratios when governments depend in part on seigniorage funding for public expenditures. We find that greater coordination of policies would lead to lower inflation and interest rates but higher reserve-requirement ratios. Because higher reserve-requirement ratios could place European banks at a competititve disadvantage, we conclude that the interaction between reserve requirements and seigniorage concerns makes it less likely that the gradualist approach of the Maastricht treaty is a sustainable means of transition to European union. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph Daniels & David Hoose, 1996. "Reserve requirements, currency substitution, and seigniorage in the transition to European monetary union," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 257-273, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:7:y:1996:i:3:p:257-273
    DOI: 10.1007/BF01886824
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/BF01886824
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sibert, Anne, 1994. "The allocation of seigniorage in a common currency area," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1-2), pages 111-122, August.
    2. Daniel Gros & Guyvandille, 1995. "Seigniorage and EMU: The Fiscal Implications of Price Stability and Financial Market Integration," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(2), pages 175-196, June.
    3. Klein,Martin & Neumann,Manfred, "undated". "Seignorage: What is it and who gets it?," Discussion Paper Serie B 124, University of Bonn, Germany.
    4. Aizenman, Joshua, 1992. "Competitive Externalities and the Optimal Seigniorage," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 24(1), pages 61-71, February.
    5. Canzoneri, Matthew B. & Diba, Behzad T., 1992. "The inflation discipline of currency substitution," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 827-845, May.
    6. Bacchetta, Philippe & Caminal, Ramon, 1992. "Optimal seigniorage and financial liberalization," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(6), pages 518-538, December.
    7. Canzoneri, Matthew B & Rogers, Carol Ann, 1990. "Is the European Community an Optimal Currency Area? Optimal Taxation versus the Cost of Multiple Currencies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 419-433, June.
    8. Canzoneri, Matthew B. & Diba, Behzad T., 1993. "Currency substitution and exchange rate volatility in the European Community," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3-4), pages 351-365, November.
    9. Fratianni, M. & Von Hagen, J. & Waller, C., 1992. "The Maastricht Way to EMU," Princeton Studies in International Economics 187, International Economics Section, Departement of Economics Princeton University,.
    10. Horrigan, Brian R., 1988. "Are reserve requirements relevant for economic stabilization?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 97-105, January.
    11. Matthew B. Canzoneri & Dale W. Henderson, 1991. "Monetary Policy in Interdependent Economies: A Game-Theoretic Approach," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262031787, January.
    12. Mizen, Paul & Pentecost, Eric J, 1994. "Evaluating the Empirical Evidence for Currency Substitution: A Case Study of the Demand for Sterling in Europe," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(426), pages 1057-1069, September.
    13. Brock, Philip L, 1989. "Reserve Requirements and the Inflation Tax," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(1), pages 106-121, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. H. Groeneveld & A. Visser, 1997. "Seigniorage, electronic money and financial independence of central banks," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 50(200), pages 69-88.
    2. Bali, Turan G., 2000. "U.S. money demand and the welfare cost of inflation in a currency-deposit model," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 233-258.
    3. Daniels, Joseph P. & VanHoose, David D., 2003. "Currency substitution, seigniorage, and currency crises in interdependent economies," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 221-232.
    4. Baltensperger, Ernst & Jordan, Thomas J., 1997. "Seigniorage, banking, and the optimal quantity of money," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 781-796, June.
    5. H. Groeneveld & A. Visser, 1997. "Seigniorage, electronic money and financial independence of central banks," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 50(200), pages 69-88.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European Union; reserve requirements; currency substitution; F36; F42;

    JEL classification:

    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

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