IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jproda/v23y2005i1p47-64.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Localized Innovation and Productivity Growth in Asia: An Intertemporal DEA Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Marcel Timmer

    ()

  • Bart Los

Abstract

Recent contributions to growth theory stress the importance of localized innovation for the performance of more backward countries. In earlier papers, analyses by means of DEA techniques confirmed this intuition. In this paper, we extend this type of analysis by relaxing the macroeconomic viewpoint adopted until now. New databases on output, labor and capital input in the agricultural and manufacturing sectors are developed for 40 countries. Using intertemporal DEA, it is found that changes in the global production frontier are localized at high levels of capital intensity. This result is stronger in agriculture than in manufacturing. Further, a decomposition of labor productivity growth in eight Asian countries for the period 1975–1992 into the effects of capital intensification, learning and innovation is made. The results suggest that there is a particular development path in which increases in capital intensity appear to be a prerequisite to benefit from international technology spillovers. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Marcel Timmer & Bart Los, 2005. "Localized Innovation and Productivity Growth in Asia: An Intertemporal DEA Approach," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 47-64, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:23:y:2005:i:1:p:47-64
    DOI: 10.1007/s11123-004-8547-z
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11123-004-8547-z
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jens Kaüger & Uwe Cantner & Horst Hanusch, 2000. "Total factor productivity, the east Asian miracle, and the world production frontier," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 136(1), pages 111-136, March.
    2. Los, Bart & Timmer, Marcel P., 2005. "The 'appropriate technology' explanation of productivity growth differentials: An empirical approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 517-531, August.
    3. Larson, David F. & Butzer, Rita & Mundlak, Yair & Crego, Al, 2000. "A Cross-Country Database for Sector Investment and Capital," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 371-391, May.
    4. Pooran Lall & Allen Featherstone & David Norman, 2002. "Productivity Growth in the Western Hemisphere (1978–94): The Caribbean in Perspective," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 213-231, May.
    5. Joaquin Maudos & Jose Manuel Pastor & Lorenzo Serrano, 2000. "Convergence in OECD countries: technical change, efficiency and productivity," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(6), pages 757-765.
    6. Oulton,Nicholas & O'Mahony,Mary, 1994. "Productivity and Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521453455.
    7. Subodh Kumar & R. Robert Russell, 2002. "Technological Change, Technological Catch-up, and Capital Deepening: Relative Contributions to Growth and Convergence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(3), pages 527-548, June.
    8. Alwyn Young, 1995. "The Tyranny of Numbers: Confronting the Statistical Realities of the East Asian Growth Experience," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 641-680.
    9. Bernard, Andrew B & Jones, Charles I, 1996. "Comparing Apples to Oranges: Productivity Convergence and Measurement across Industries and Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1216-1238, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wen-Chih Chen & Andrew Johnson, 2010. "The dynamics of performance space of Major League Baseball pitchers 1871–2006," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 181(1), pages 287-302, December.
    2. Chiu, Yung-ho & Huang, Chin-wei & Ma, Chun-Mei, 2011. "Assessment of China transit and economic efficiencies in a modified value-chains DEA model," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 209(2), pages 95-103, March.
    3. Li, Ke & Lin, Boqiang, 2015. "Metafroniter energy efficiency with CO2 emissions and its convergence analysis for China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 230-241.
    4. Anders Isaksson, 2009. "The UNIDO World Productivity Database: An Overview," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 18, pages 38-50, Spring.
    5. López-Pueyo, Carmen & Mancebón, María-Jesús, 2010. "Innovation, accumulation and assimilation: Three sources of productivity growth in ICT industries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 268-285, March.
    6. Carmen López Pueyo & Mª Jesús Mancebón Torrubia, 2009. "Sources of productivity growth and convergence in ict industries: an intertemporal non-parametric frontier approach?," Documentos de Trabajo dt2009-04, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    7. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-141 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:jaitra:v:70:y:2018:i:c:p:1-17 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Li, Ke & Lin, Boqiang, 2015. "Measuring green productivity growth of Chinese industrial sectors during 1998–2011," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 279-295.
    10. repec:eee:enepol:v:111:y:2017:i:c:p:394-402 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Shu-Hen Chiang, 2014. "The dilemma of "Twin Cities": is the suburban dependence hypothesis applicable?," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 149-163, June.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:23:y:2005:i:1:p:47-64. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Mallaigh Nolan). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.