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Food security implications of global marine catch losses due to overfishing

Author

Listed:
  • U. Srinivasan

    ()

  • William Cheung
  • Reg Watson
  • U. Sumaila

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • U. Srinivasan & William Cheung & Reg Watson & U. Sumaila, 2010. "Food security implications of global marine catch losses due to overfishing," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 183-200, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbioec:v:12:y:2010:i:3:p:183-200
    DOI: 10.1007/s10818-010-9090-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cheung, William W.L. & Sumaila, U. Rashid, 2008. "Trade-offs between conservation and socio-economic objectives in managing a tropical marine ecosystem," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 193-210, May.
    2. U. Sumaila & Ahmed Khan & Andrew Dyck & Reg Watson & Gordon Munro & Peter Tydemers & Daniel Pauly, 2010. "A bottom-up re-estimation of global fisheries subsidies," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 201-225, October.
    3. Christophe Béné & Bjørn Hersoug & Edward H. Allison, 2010. "Not by Rent Alone: Analysing the Pro-Poor Functions of Small-Scale Fisheries in Developing Countries," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 28(3), pages 325-358, May.
    4. Bjorndal, Trond, 1988. "The optimal management of North Sea Herring," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 9-29, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Lynham, 2012. "Ecomarkets For Conservation And Sustainable Development in the Coastal Zone," Working Papers 201218, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    2. Christopher Costello & Olivier Deschênes & Ashley Larsen & Steven Gaines, 2014. "Removing biases in forecasts of fishery status," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 213-219, July.
    3. Cleasby, Nathan & Schwarz, Anne-Maree & Phillips, Michael & Paul, Chris & Pant, Jharendu & Oeta, Janet & Pickering, Tim & Meloty, Alex & Laumani, Michael & Kori, Max, 2014. "The socio-economic context for improving food security through land based aquaculture in Solomon Islands: A peri-urban case study," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 89-97.
    4. Béné, Christophe & Arthur, Robert & Norbury, Hannah & Allison, Edward H. & Beveridge, Malcolm & Bush, Simon & Campling, Liam & Leschen, Will & Little, David & Squires, Dale & Thilsted, Shakuntala H. &, 2016. "Contribution of Fisheries and Aquaculture to Food Security and Poverty Reduction: Assessing the Current Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 177-196.
    5. Sugiawan, Yogi & Islam, Moinul & Managi, Shunsuke, 2017. "Global marine fisheries with economic growth," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 158-168.
    6. Schuhbauer, Anna & Sumaila, U. Rashid, 2016. "Economic viability and small-scale fisheries — A review," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 69-75.
    7. Akpalu, Wisdom, 2013. "Foreign Aid and Sustainable Fisheries Management in Sub-Saharan Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 100, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Leonid Gokhberg & Ilya Kuzminov & Pavel Bakhtin & Elena Tochilina & Alexander Chulok & Anton Timofeev & Alina Lavrinenko, 2017. "Big-Data-Augmented Approach to Emerging Technologies Identification: Case of Agriculture and Food Sector," HSE Working papers WP BRP 76/STI/2017, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    9. Aguilar Ibarra, Alonso & Sanchez Vargas, Armando & Martinez Lopez, Benjamin, 2012. "Economic impacts of climate change on two Mexican coastal fisheries: Implications to food security," Economics Discussion Papers 2012-64, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Allison, E.H., 2011. "Aquaculture, fisheries, poverty and food security," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 39575, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Catch loss; Food security; Undernourishment; Landed values; Q22; D57;

    JEL classification:

    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery
    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis

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