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Why U.S. health care expenditure and ranking on health care indicators are so different from Canada’s

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  • A. Spithoven

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Suggested Citation

  • A. Spithoven, 2009. "Why U.S. health care expenditure and ranking on health care indicators are so different from Canada’s," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-24, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:9:y:2009:i:1:p:1-24
    DOI: 10.1007/s10754-008-9044-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel P. Kessler & Mark McClellan, 1996. "Do Doctors Practice Defensive Medicine?," NBER Working Papers 5466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Patricia M. Danzon & Y. Richard Wang & Liang Wang, 2005. "The impact of price regulation on the launch delay of new drugs-evidence from twenty-five major markets in the 1990s," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 269-292.
    3. Starfield, Barbara & Shi, Leiyu, 2002. "Policy relevant determinants of health: an international perspective," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 201-218, June.
    4. Sara Fisher Ellison & Catherine Wolfram, 2001. "Pharmaceutical Prices and Political Activity," NBER Working Papers 8482, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Lopez, Russ, 2004. "Income inequality and self-rated health in US metropolitan areas: A multi-level analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(12), pages 2409-2419, December.
    6. George Karatzas, 2000. "On the determination of the US aggregate health care expenditure," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(9), pages 1085-1099.
    7. Scherer, F.M., 2000. "The pharmaceutical industry," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 25, pages 1297-1336 Elsevier.
    8. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 2007. "The Value of Life and the Rise in Health Spending," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(1), pages 39-72.
    9. Jay Bhattacharya & M. Kate Bundorf, 2005. "The Incidence of the Healthcare Costs of Obesity," NBER Working Papers 11303, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Daniel Kessler & Mark McClellan, 1996. "Do Doctors Practice Defensive Medicine?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 353-390.
    11. repec:reg:rpubli:141 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. John Nixon & Philippe Ulmann, 2006. "The relationship between health care expenditure and health outcomes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 7(1), pages 7-18, March.
    13. Meena Seshamani & Alastair Gray, 2004. "Ageing and health-care expenditure: the red herring argument revisited," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 303-314.
    14. Katherine Baicker & Amitabh Chandra, 2005. "The Effect of Malpractice Liability on the Delivery of Health Care," NBER Chapters,in: Frontiers in Health Policy Research, Volume 8 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Roger Feldman & Felix Lobo, 1997. "Global Budgets and Excess Demand for Hospital Care," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(2), pages 187-196.
    16. Sato, Yuko, 2001. "Comparative analysis of health care costs in Japan and the United States: a simulation of productivity and savings behavior," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 429-454, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicolas Ziebarth, 2014. "Assessing the effectiveness of health care cost containment measures: evidence from the market for rehabilitation care," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 41-67, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health care expenditure; United States; Canada; I10; I12;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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