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Introduction: Current Research on Medical Malpractice Liability

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  • Anup Malani

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  • Anup Malani, 2007. "Introduction: Current Research on Medical Malpractice Liability," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(S2), pages 1-8, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlstud:v:36:y:2007:i:s2:p:s1-s8
    DOI: 10.1086/587430
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel P. Kessler & Mark McClellan, 1996. "Do Doctors Practice Defensive Medicine?," NBER Working Papers 5466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Katherine Baicker & Amitabh Chandra, 2005. "The Effect of Malpractice Liability on the Delivery of Health Care," NBER Chapters, in: Frontiers in Health Policy Research, Volume 8, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Daniel Kessler & Mark McClellan, 1996. "Do Doctors Practice Defensive Medicine?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 353-390.
    4. Dubay, Lisa & Kaestner, Robert & Waidmann, Timothy, 1999. "The impact of malpractice fears on cesarean section rates," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 491-522, August.
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