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Entrepreneurship and Independent Professionals: Social and Economic Logics

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  • Dieter Bögenhold

    ()

  • Jarna Heinonen

    ()

  • Elisa Akola

    ()

Abstract

This study discusses stereotypes of entrepreneurship by looking at the overlapping areas of entrepreneurship, self-employment and professions. Professions are part of the category of self-employment and the study presents empirical findings drawn from a unique empirical dataset from Finland: a survey (N = 733) including freelance journalists, translators, interpreters and artists at the blurred boundaries between waged work and entrepreneurship. Findings reveal that the professions are clearly different and the manifestations of entrepreneurship vary, reflecting the work and the labor market situation within the profession. Life and work situations of liberal professions cannot be interpreted in simple black-and-white schemes of winners and losers. Instead, many different socioeconomic situations can be found ‘in between,’ which are driven by different social logics. For entrepreneurship research, the study opens up new avenues by taking us beyond the push-pull dichotomy, which over-simplifies the decision to enter self-employment. The term entrepreneurship is often used in an undifferentiated way, and it easily generates myths and stereotypes which are challenged by the study. A narrower and more realistic view shows that there are diverse agents under the flag of entrepreneurship, who are usually not regarded as core entrepreneurs although they exist in everyday life. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Dieter Bögenhold & Jarna Heinonen & Elisa Akola, 2014. "Entrepreneurship and Independent Professionals: Social and Economic Logics," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 20(3), pages 295-310, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:iaecre:v:20:y:2014:i:3:p:295-310:10.1007/s11294-014-9474-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s11294-014-9474-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marco Cagetti & Mariacristina De Nardi, 2006. "Entrepreneurship, Frictions, and Wealth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(5), pages 835-870, October.
    2. David Audretsch, 2009. "The entrepreneurial society," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 245-254, June.
    3. Erik Stam, 2008. "Entrepreneurship and Innovation Policy," Jena Economic Research Papers 2008-006, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. Jean Bonnet & Domingo García Pérez-De-Lema & Howard Van Auken, 2010. "The Entrepreneurial society: how to fill the gap between knowledge and innovation," Post-Print halshs-00555032, HAL.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:hig:fsight:v:11:y:2017:i:4:p:23-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alexander Chepurenko, 2015. "Entrepreneurship Theory: New Challenges and Future Prospects," Foresight and STI Governance (Foresight-Russia till No. 3/2015), National Research University Higher School of Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 44-57.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; Professions; Self-employment; Occupational careers; Waged work; Transitions; Labor market; D2; J4; J6; M2;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • M2 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Economics

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