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The role of cognitive ability and personality traits for men and women in gift exchange outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Emel Filiz-Ozbay

    () (University of Maryland)

  • John C. Ham

    () (National University of Singapore)

  • John H. Kagel

    () (Ohio State University)

  • Erkut Y. Ozbay

    () (University of Maryland)

Abstract

We examine the role of cognitive ability and personality traits in a gift exchange experiment. Controlling for cognitive ability and personality characteristics, men offer higher wages than women, and men and women with greater cognitive ability and greater agreeableness on the Big Five personality scale offer higher wages as well. Men provide greater effort than women do, and respond to higher wage rates with greater increases in effort. For both genders, one standard deviation increases in agreeableness and in wages generate similar increases in effort. Serious biases arise from omitting cognitive ability and pooling men and women.

Suggested Citation

  • Emel Filiz-Ozbay & John C. Ham & John H. Kagel & Erkut Y. Ozbay, 2018. "The role of cognitive ability and personality traits for men and women in gift exchange outcomes," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(3), pages 650-672, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:21:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10683-016-9503-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-016-9503-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gruener, Sven, 2018. "Sample size calculations in economic RCTs: following clinical studies?," SocArXiv 43zbg, Center for Open Science.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gift exchange experiment; Big five personality characteristics; SAT scores;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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