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The Allocation of Time and Risk of Lyme: A Case of Ecosystem Service Income and Substitution Effects

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  • Kevin Berry

    () (University of Alaska Anchorage
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies)

  • Jude Bayham

    (California State University, Chico)

  • Spencer R. Meyer

    (Highstead Foundation)

  • Eli P. Fenichel

    (Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies)

Abstract

Forests are often touted for their ecosystem services, including outdoor recreation. Historically forests were a source of danger and were avoided. Forests continue to be reservoirs for infectious diseases and their vectors—a disservice. We examine how this disservice undermines the potential recreational services by measuring the human response to environmental risk using exogenous variation in the risk of contracting Lyme Disease. We find evidence that individuals substitute away from spending time outdoors when there is greater risk of Lyme Disease infection. On average individuals spent 1.54 fewer minutes per day outdoors at the average, 72 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, confirmed cases of Lyme Disease. We estimate lost outdoor recreation of 9.41 h per year per person in an average county in the Northeastern United States and an aggregate welfare loss on the order $2.8 billion to $5.0 billion per year.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Berry & Jude Bayham & Spencer R. Meyer & Eli P. Fenichel, 2018. "The Allocation of Time and Risk of Lyme: A Case of Ecosystem Service Income and Substitution Effects," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 70(3), pages 631-650, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:70:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10640-017-0142-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-017-0142-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shuyao Wu & Jiao Huang & Shuangcheng Li, 2020. "Classifying ecosystem disservices and comparing their effects with ecosystem services in Beijing, China," Papers 2001.01605, arXiv.org.
    2. Stephen C. Newbold & David Finnoff & Linda Thunström & Madison Ashworth & Jason F. Shogren, 2020. "Effects of Physical Distancing to Control COVID-19 on Public Health, the Economy, and the Environment," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 76(4), pages 705-729, August.

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