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How real is the threat of imprisonment for environmental crime?

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  • Carole Billiet
  • Sandra Rousseau

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Abstract

In this contribution, we investigate whether prison sentences for environmental crime are indeed used in practice, how they are used and whether they imply a real threat to violators. To this end we examine previous studies on the role of imprisonment and confront these models with some empirical data. The empirical application summarizes evidence from several countries, but focuses on detailed data for criminal prosecution of environmental legislation in Flanders (Belgium) between 2003 and 2007. Thus we are able to highlight some interesting policy issues and directions for future research. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Carole Billiet & Sandra Rousseau, 2014. "How real is the threat of imprisonment for environmental crime?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 183-198, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ejlwec:v:37:y:2014:i:2:p:183-198 DOI: 10.1007/s10657-011-9267-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Enforcement; Environmental offenses; Prison sentences; Criminal prosecution; K32 Environmental; health and safety law; K41 Litigation process; K42 Illegal behavior and the enforcement of law;

    JEL classification:

    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law
    • K41 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Litigation Process
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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