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Land Endowment, Intersectoral Labor Mobility, and Economic Geography

  • Christopher Colburn
  • Haiwen Zhou

    ()

The distribution of industries is studied in a general equilibrium model in which firms producing manufactured products engage in oligopolistic competition. The agricultural product is produced by land and labor and there is intersectoral labor mobility between the agricultural sector and the manufacturing sector. Results are derived analytically. When worker units are divisible, concentration of all workers in one region is not stable. The role of land in the production of the agricultural product is important in affecting the distribution of industries. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2010

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11293-010-9245-z
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Article provided by International Atlantic Economic Society in its journal Atlantic Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 429-441

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Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:38:y:2010:i:4:p:429-441
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  1. Diego Puga, 1996. "The rise and fall of regional inequalities," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20643, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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