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Land Endowment, Intersectoral Labor Mobility, and Economic Geography


  • Christopher Colburn
  • Haiwen Zhou



The distribution of industries is studied in a general equilibrium model in which firms producing manufactured products engage in oligopolistic competition. The agricultural product is produced by land and labor and there is intersectoral labor mobility between the agricultural sector and the manufacturing sector. Results are derived analytically. When worker units are divisible, concentration of all workers in one region is not stable. The role of land in the production of the agricultural product is important in affecting the distribution of industries. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2010

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Colburn & Haiwen Zhou, 2010. "Land Endowment, Intersectoral Labor Mobility, and Economic Geography," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 38(4), pages 429-441, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:38:y:2010:i:4:p:429-441
    DOI: 10.1007/s11293-010-9245-z

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ciccone, Antonio, 2002. "Agglomeration effects in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 213-227, February.
    2. Rappaport, Jordan & Sachs, Jeffrey D, 2003. "The United States as a Coastal Nation," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 5-46, March.
    3. Puga, Diego, 1999. "The rise and fall of regional inequalities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 303-334, February.
    4. Donald R. Davis & David E. Weinstein, 2008. "A Search For Multiple Equilibria In Urban Industrial Structure," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 29-65.
    5. J.Peter Neary, 2001. "Of Hype and Hyperbolas: Introducing the New Economic Geography," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 536-561, June.
    6. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    7. N. Gregory Mankiw & Michael D. Whinston, 1986. "Free Entry and Social Inefficiency," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 17(1), pages 48-58, Spring.
    8. Chang, Sheng-Wen & Coulson, N. Edward, 2001. "Sources of Sectoral Employment Fluctuations in Central Cities and Suburbs: Evidence from Four Eastern U.S. Cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 199-218, March.
    9. Haiwen Zhou, 2007. "Oligopolistic Competition And Economic Geography," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(5), pages 915-933.
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    More about this item


    Economic geography; Land endowment; Intersectoral labor mobility; Increasing returns; Oligopolistic competition; R10; F12; F20;

    JEL classification:

    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General


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