IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/86533.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Factor Returns and Circular Causality

Author

Listed:
  • Zhou, Haiwen

Abstract

The presence of circular causality in a region through factor returns is studied in a general equilibrium model in which firms producing final products engage in oligopolistic competition. The intermediate input is produced by capital and labor with a constant returns to scale technology. If the degree of increasing returns in the production of final products is sufficiently high, the return to a factor can increase with the amount of this factor. Thus a higher amount of a factor in a region leads to a higher return to this factor and attracts additional amount of this factor to move in. Capital movement and labor movement can be reinforcing. This type of circular causality means that unbalanced regional development can persist over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhou, Haiwen, 2018. "Factor Returns and Circular Causality," MPRA Paper 86533, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:86533
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/86533/1/MPRA_paper_86533.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ciccone, Antonio, 2002. "Agglomeration effects in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 213-227, February.
    2. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
    3. Kiminori Matsuyama, 1995. "Complementarities and Cumulative Processes in Models of Monopolistic Competition," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 701-729, June.
    4. Haiwen Zhou, 2007. "Increasing Returns, the Choice of Technology, and the Gains from Trade," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 581-600, October.
    5. Haiwen Zhou, 2004. "The division of labor and the extent of the market," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 24(1), pages 195-209, July.
    6. J.Peter Neary, 2001. "Of Hype and Hyperbolas: Introducing the New Economic Geography," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 536-561, June.
    7. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    8. Chong-En Bai & Chang-Tai Hsieh & Yingyi Qian, 2006. "The Return to Capital in China," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 37(2), pages 61-102.
    9. Yasheng Huang, 2005. "Symposium on 'Selling China: Foreign Direct Investment during the Reform Era' - Huang's Response," Management and Organization Review, International Association of Chinese Management Research, vol. 1(2), pages 329-333, July.
    10. Haiwen Zhou, 2009. "Population Growth And Industrialization," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(2), pages 249-265, April.
    11. Richard Baldwin & Rikard Forslid & Philippe Martin & Gianmarco Ottaviano & Frederic Robert-Nicoud, 2005. "Economic Geography and Public Policy," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 7524.
    12. Junxi Zhang, 2007. "Endogenous Markups, Intensity of Competition, and Persistence of Business Cycles," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 546-565, October.
    13. Lahiri, Sajal & Ono, Yoshiyasu, 1988. "Helping Minor Firms Reduces Welfare," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(393), pages 1199-1202, December.
    14. N. Gregory Mankiw & Michael D. Whinston, 1986. "Free Entry and Social Inefficiency," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 17(1), pages 48-58, Spring.
    15. Lahiri, Sajal & Ono, Yoshiyasu, 1995. "The Role of Free Entry in an Oligopolistic Heckscher-Ohlin Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(3), pages 609-624, August.
    16. Haiwen Zhou, 2007. "Oligopolistic Competition And Economic Geography," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(5), pages 915-933.
    17. Dmytro Holod & Robert R. Reed, 2009. "Regional External Economies and Economic Growth under Asymmetry," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 1123-1140, April.
    18. Richard Baldwin & Rikard Forslid & Philippe Martin & Gianmarco Ottaviano & Frederic Robert Nicoud, 2003. "Economic Geography and Public Policy," Post-Print halshs-00179815, HAL.
    19. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2006. "Globalization and the Poor Periphery before 1950," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262232502, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Binglin Gong & Haiwen Zhou, 2014. "Financial development, the choice of technology, and comparative advantage," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(8), pages 1238-1261, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Factor return; circular causation; increasing returns; oligopolistic competition; intermediate input;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:86533. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.