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Post-purchase Counseling and Default Resolutions among Low- and Moderate-Income Borrowers

Author

Listed:
  • Lei Ding

    () (University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599)

  • Roberto G. Quercia

    () (University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599)

  • Janneke Ratcliffe

    () (University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599)

Abstract

The rise of delinquencies and foreclosures in a softening housing market calls for systematic studies of default behavior and efforts to minimize the default risks. Using a sample of residential mortgages made to low- to moderate-income borrowers, this paper empirically examines the impact of a proactive post-purchase counseling service on moderately delinquent mortgages. It demonstrates that well-timed, situation-appropriate counseling, even over the phone, effectively increases the curing probability of delinquent borrowers. The findings hold even after accounting for unobserved heterogeneity among borrowers and the endogeneity problem. Many other factors, such as home equity, local economic conditions, and borrower and loan characteristics, also impact the transition of delinquencies.

Suggested Citation

  • Lei Ding & Roberto G. Quercia & Janneke Ratcliffe, 2008. "Post-purchase Counseling and Default Resolutions among Low- and Moderate-Income Borrowers," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 30(3), pages 315-344.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:30:n:3:2008:p:315-344
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anthony Pennington-Cross, 2006. "The Value of Foreclosed Property," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 28(2), pages 193-214.
    2. Gordon W. Crawford & Eric Rosenblatt, 1995. "Efficient Mortgage Default Option Exercise: Evidence from Loss Severity," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 10(5), pages 543-556.
    3. J. Collins, 2007. "Exploring the Design of Financial Counseling for Mortgage Borrowers in Default," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 207-226, June.
    4. Brent W. Ambrose & Charles A. Capone, 1998. "Modeling the Conditional Probability of Foreclosure in the Context of Single-Family Mortgage Default Resolutions," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 26(3), pages 391-429.
    5. Simon Firestone & Robert Van Order & Peter Zorn, 2007. "The Performance of Low-Income and Minority Mortgages," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 479-504, December.
    6. Dennis Capozza & Thomas Thomson, 2006. "Subprime Transitions: Lingering or Malingering in Default?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 241-258, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Margaret Miller & Julia Reichelstein & Christian Salas & Bilal Zia, 2015. "Can You Help Someone Become Financially Capable? A Meta-Analysis of the Literature," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 220-246.
    2. Stephanie Moulton & C├Ązilia Loibl & Anya Samak & J. Michael Collins, 2013. "Borrowing Capacity and Financial Decisions of Low-to-Moderate Income First-Time Homebuyers," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 375-403, November.
    3. Marius Ascheberg & Robert A. Jarrow & Holger Kraft & Yildiray Yildirim, 2014. "Government Policies, Residential Mortgage Defaults and the Boom and Bust Cycle of Housing Prices," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(3), pages 627-661, September.
    4. Tim Kaiser & Lukas Menkhoff, 2017. "Does Financial Education Impact Financial Literacy and Financial Behavior, and If So, When?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(3), pages 611-630.
    5. J. Michael Collins & Maximilian D. Schmeiser & Carly Urban, 2013. "Protecting Minority Homeowners: Race, Foreclosure Counseling and Mortgage Modifications," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 289-310, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services

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