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China¡¯S Growth Story: The Role Of Physical And Social Infrastructure

Author

Listed:
  • PRAVAKAR SAHOO

    () (Institute of Economic Growth, India)

  • RANJAN KUMAR DASH

    (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations)

  • GEETHANJALI NATARAJ

    (National Council of Applied Economic Research, India)

Abstract

The paper investigates the role of infrastructure in promoting economic growth in China using ARDL and GMM techniques for the period 1975 to 2007. In this context, an attempt is made to understand growth accounting equations to investigate the impact of infrastructure development on output. Overall, the results reveal that infrastructure stock, labour force, public and private investment play an important role in economic growth in China. More importantly, the study finds that Infrastructure development in China has significant positive contribution to growth than both private and public investment. Further, there is unidirectional causality from infrastructure development to output growth justifying China¡¯s high spending on infrastructure development since the early nineties. The experience from China suggests that it is necessary to design an economic policy that improves the physical infrastructure as well as human capital formation for sustainable economic growth in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Pravakar Sahoo & Ranjan Kumar Dash & Geethanjali Nataraj, 2012. "China¡¯S Growth Story: The Role Of Physical And Social Infrastructure," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 37(1), pages 53-75, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:jed:journl:v:37:y:2012:i:1:p:53-75
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Quoc-Anh Do & Kieu-Trang Nguyen & Anh N. Tran, 2013. "One Mandarin Benefits the Whole Clan: Hometown Favoritism in an Authoritarian Regime," Sciences Po publications 13, Sciences Po.
    2. Alfredo M. Pereira & Jorge M. Andraz, 2013. "On The Economic Effects Of Public Infrastructure Investment: A Survey Of The International Evidence," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 1-37, December.
    3. Quoc-Anh Do & Kieu-Trang Nguyen & Anh N. Tran, 2016. "One Mandarin Benefits the Whole Clan: Hometown Favoritism in an Authoritarian Regime," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/2q4cjijvsm8, Sciences Po.
    4. Quoc-Anh Do & Kieu-Trang Nguyen & Anh N. Tran, 2017. "One Mandarin Benefits the Whole Clan: Hometown Favoritism in an Authoritarian Regime," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/sj22pruud8a, Sciences Po.
    5. Do, Quoc-Anh & Nguyen, Kieu-Trang & Tran, Anh N., 2017. "One Mandarin benefits the whole clan: hometown favoritism in an authoritarian regime," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85928, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. repec:eee:transa:v:100:y:2017:i:c:p:319-336 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Víctor Adame & Javier Alonso & Luisa Pérez & David Tuesta, 2017. "Infrastructure & economic growth from a meta-analysis approach: do all roads lead to Rome?," Working Papers 17/07, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
    8. Indunil De Silva & Sudarno Sumarto, 2015. "Dynamics Of Growth, Poverty And Human Capital: Evidence From Indonesian Sub-National Data," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 40(2), pages 1-33, June.
    9. repec:rej:journl:v:20:y:2017:i:63:p:126-146 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; Infrastructure Development; Investment; Output Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • L9 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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