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Social Reputation: a Mechanism for Flexible Self-Regulation of Multiagent Systems

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Abstract

In this paper, we use multiagent technology for social simulation of sociological micro-macro issues in the domain of electronic marketplaces. We argue that allowing self-interested agents to enable social reputation as a mechanism for flexible self-regulation during runtime can improve the robustness and 'social order' of multiagent systems to cope with various perturbations that arise when simulating open markets (e.g. dynamic modifications of task profiles, scaling of agent populations, agent drop-outs, deviant behaviour). Referring to the sociological theory of Pierre Bourdieu, we provide a multi-level concept of reputation that consists of three different types (image, social esteem, and prestige) and considers reputation as a kind of 'symbolic capital'. Reputation is regarded to be objectified as an observable property and to be incorporated into the agents' mental structures through social practices of communication on different aggregation levels of sociality. We present and analyse selected results of our social simulations and discuss the importance of reputation with regard to the robustness of multiagent simulations of electronic markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Hahn & Bettina Fley & Michael Florian & Daniela Spresny & Klaus Fischer, 2007. "Social Reputation: a Mechanism for Flexible Self-Regulation of Multiagent Systems," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 10(1), pages 1-2.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:2006-13-4
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    File URL: http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/1/2/2.pdf
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    1. Chrysanthos Dellarocas, 2003. "The Digitization of Word of Mouth: Promise and Challenges of Online Feedback Mechanisms," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(10), pages 1407-1424, October.
    2. David Hales, 2002. "Group Reputation Supports Beneficent Norms," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 5(4), pages 1-4.
    3. Kreps, David M. & Wilson, Robert, 1982. "Reputation and imperfect information," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 253-279, August.
    4. Juliette Rouchier & Martin O'Connor & Fran├žois Bousquet, 2001. "The Creation of a Reputation in an Artificial Society Organised by a Gift System," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 4(2), pages 1-8.
    5. Cristiano Castelfranchi & Rosaria Conte & Mario Paolucci, 1998. "Normative Reputation and the Costs of Compliance," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 1(3), pages 1-3.
    6. Dellarocas, Chrysanthos, 2003. "The Digitization of Word-of-mouth: Promise and Challenges of Online Feedback Mechanisms," Working papers 4296-03, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yutaka Nakai & Masayoshi Muto, 2008. "Emergence and Collapse of Peace with Friend Selection Strategies," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11(3), pages 1-6.
    2. repec:eee:touman:v:37:y:2013:i:c:p:203-209 is not listed on IDEAS

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