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A Tax-Benefit Model for Austria (AUTAX): Work Incentives and Distributional Effects of the 2016 Tax Reform

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Christl

    () (Agenda Austria, Vienna, Austria)

  • Monika Köppl-Turyna

    () (Agenda Austria, Vienna, Austria)

  • Dénes Kucsera

    () (Agenda Austria, Vienna, Austria)

Abstract

This study introduces a tax-benefit model based on administrative data for Austria (AUTAX) that can be used for theex ante and ex post evaluation of reforms of personal income taxation and social benefits. We analyze the effects of the 2016 Austrian tax reform ex anteand concentrate on the effects on the distribution of net income and on work incentives. Our results show that the changes to the tax brackets have slightly increased inequality, and the middle- and high-income earners profited most. This effect has been significantly lowered by an increase in the negative income tax for low-income earners. By calculating average effective tax rates (AETRs) as well as marginal effective tax rates (METRs) along the whole income distribution in our model, we discuss changes on work incentives on the extensive but also on the intensive margin. We show that the 2016 tax reform positively affected the work incentives on the extensive and the intensive margin for higher income groups. The additional change in the negative income tax had only an impact on the extensive margin of low-income earners. These low-income earners are usually part-time workers, therefore giving a higher incentive to work part-time but no additional incentive to increase working hours. We show that a decrease in social security contributions instead of an increase in the negative income tax for low-income earners would lead to an increase in both the extensive and the intensive margin.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Christl & Monika Köppl-Turyna & Dénes Kucsera, 2017. "A Tax-Benefit Model for Austria (AUTAX): Work Incentives and Distributional Effects of the 2016 Tax Reform," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 10(2), pages 144-176.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v10:y:2017:i:2:p:144-176
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Margit Schratzenstaller, 2015. "Tax Reform of 2015-16 – Measures and Overall Assessment," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 88(5), pages 371-385, May.
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    3. Michael Christl & Dénes Kucsera, 2015. "Will the Tax Reform of 2015-16 Offset the Cumulative Effect of Bracket Creep?," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 88(5), pages 447-453, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    MICROSIMULATION; WAGETAX; WORK INCENTIVES; INCOME INEQUALITY;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • E65 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Studies of Particular Policy Episodes
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques

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