IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ijf/ijfiec/v9y2004i2p151-164.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Foreign university graduates in the Greek labour market: Employment, salaries and overeducation

Author

Listed:
  • Theodore P. Lianos

    (Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece)

  • D. Asteriou

    (City University, UK)

  • G.M. Agiomirgianakis

Abstract

Greece is ranked among the first countries of the world in terms of student migration, while compared with other EU countries Greece has the highest number of students studying in other member states. Although the issue of migrating Greek students is constantly analysed in the newspapers, and often in relation to the educational policy adopted in Greece, 1 most of the academic literature (Kanellopoulos and Psacharopoulos, 1997) is focused either on the cost side of this phenomenon in terms of expenditure and its implications for the balance of payments or on the loss of brains (Brain Drain) when the best students remain abroad. So far, to the best of our knowledge, no research effort has been devoted to examining how well these students perform in the Greek labour market when they return home after completion of their studies. More specifically, in this paper we examine the performance of foreign university graduates with respect to three aspects: (a) the length of time between the completion of their studies and employment; (b) the extent to which these graduates are employed in professions for which they studied; and (c) the extent to which they are overqualified in the performance of the job which they hold. Our findings suggest that (i) EU graduates are better placed in the Greek labour market, from an employability point of view, compared with graduates from all other countries and also get higher salaries compared with those who have been educated elsewhere, and particularly those educated in the Balkan countries; (ii) factors leading to higher returns after graduation are previous work experience, whether the graduate had worked systematically in the past and also if their qualification is at MSc|MA level or higher. Moreover, graduates perceiving that their qualifications are higher than their job requirements are getting higher returns; (iii) graduates with parents having a university qualification do not consider themselves as overqualified. This probably indicates that the perception of being overeducated or not is based to some degree on past family achievements and consequently one's decision to undertake studies, and the level of these studies, is taken on family, social and cultural grounds; (iv) overeducation does not place graduates in a better position from the point of view of employability, however, overeducated graduates do have higher salaries. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Theodore P. Lianos & D. Asteriou & G.M. Agiomirgianakis, 2004. "Foreign university graduates in the Greek labour market: Employment, salaries and overeducation," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(2), pages 151-164.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijf:ijfiec:v:9:y:2004:i:2:p:151-164
    DOI: 10.1002/ijfe.238
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/ijfe.238
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1002/ijfe.238?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Allen, Jim & van der Velden, Rolf, 2001. "Educational Mismatches versus Skill Mismatches: Effects on Wages, Job Satisfaction, and On-the-Job Search," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 434-452, July.
    2. Dolton, Peter & Vignoles, Anna, 2000. "The incidence and effects of overeducation in the U.K. graduate labour market," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 179-198, April.
    3. H. Battu & C. R. Belfield & P. J. Sloane, 1999. "Overeducation Among Graduates: a cohort view," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 21-38.
    4. McGoldrick, KimMarie & Robst, John, 1996. "Gender Differences in Overeducation: A Test of the Theory of Differential Overqualification," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 280-284, May.
    5. Sicherman, Nachum, 1991. ""Overeducation" in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 101-122, April.
    6. Dolton, Peter & Silles, Mary, 2001. "Over education in the graduate labour market: some evidence from alumni data," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19546, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Hersch, Joni, 1991. "Education Match and Job Match," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(1), pages 140-144, February.
    8. Tsang, Mun C. & Levin, Henry M., 1985. "The economics of overeducation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 93-104, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. TAKENAKA Ayumi & ISHIDA Kenji & NAKAMURO Makiko, 2012. "Negative Assimilation: How Immigrants Experience Economic Mobility in Japan," ESRI Discussion paper series 293, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    2. Theo Sparreboom & Alexander Tarvid, 2016. "Imbalanced Job Polarization and Skills Mismatch in Europe," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 49(1), pages 15-42, July.
    3. Jacek Liwinski, 2019. "Does it pay to study abroad? Evidence from Poland," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 40(3), pages 525-555, June.
    4. Ayumi Takenaka & Makiko Nakamuro & Kenji Ishida, 2016. "Negative Assimilation: How Immigrants Experience Economic Mobility in Japan," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 506-533, June.
    5. Livanos, Ilias & Pouliakas, Konstantinos, 2009. "The Gender Wage Gap as a Function of Educational Degree Choices in an Occupationally Segregated EU Country," IZA Discussion Papers 4636, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Baruch, Yehuda & Budhwar, Pawan S. & Khatri, Naresh, 2007. "Brain drain: Inclination to stay abroad after studies," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 99-112, March.
    7. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Livanos, Ilias, 2008. "The Gender Wage Gap as a Function of Educational Degree Choices in Greece," MPRA Paper 14168, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Mar 2009.
    8. Lois Labrianidis & Theodosis Sykas, 2017. "Why High School Students Aspire to Emigrate: Evidence from Greece," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 107-130, February.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. repec:kap:iaecre:v:11:y:2005:i:1:p:93-109 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Verhaest, Dieter & Schatteman, Tom, 2010. "Overeducation in the early career: an analysis using sequence techniques," Working Papers 2010/09, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
    3. Lourdes Badillo-Amador & Antonio García-Sánchez & Luis Vila, 2005. "Mismatches in the Spanish Labor Market: Education vs. Competence Match," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 11(1), pages 93-109, February.
    4. Ingrid Linsley, 2005. "Overeducation in the Australian Labour Market : Its Incidence and Effects," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 939, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Joanne Lindley & Steven McIntosh, 2010. "Is the Over-Education Wage Penalty Permanent?," Working Papers 2010004, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2010.
    6. Maud Hensen & Robert de Vries, 2004. "The relationship between geographical mobility and education-job mismatches," ERSA conference papers ersa04p158, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Ferrari, Filippo, 2010. "Skill mismatch e profili professionali: il settore turistico-alberghiero [Skill mismatch in tourism and hotel sector]," MPRA Paper 22363, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Brian Clark & Clément Joubert & Arnaud Maurel, 2017. "The career prospects of overeducated Americans," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-29, December.
    9. L. Cattani & G. Guidetti & G. Pedrini, 2014. "Assessing the incidence and wage effects of overeducation among Italian graduates using a new measure for educational requirements," Working Papers wp939, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    10. Keith A. Bender & John S. Heywood, 2017. "Educational mismatch and retirement," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 347-365, July.
    11. Sucharita Ghosh & Emanuele Grassi, 2020. "Overeducation and overskilling in the early careers of PhD graduates: Does international migration reduce labour market mismatch?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(4), pages 915-944, August.
    12. Giorgio Di Pietro & Peter Urwin, 2006. "Education and skills mismatch in the Italian graduate labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 79-93.
    13. Keith A. Bender & John S. Heywood, 2009. "Educational Mismatch among Ph.D.s: Determinants and Consequences," NBER Chapters, in: Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, pages 229-255, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Baert, Stijn & Cockx, Bart & Verhaest, Dieter, 2013. "Overeducation at the start of the career: Stepping stone or trap?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 123-140.
    15. Sara Flisi & Valentina Goglio & Elena Claudia Meroni & Margarida Rodrigues & Esperanza Vera-Toscano, 2017. "Measuring Occupational Mismatch: Overeducation and Overskill in Europe—Evidence from PIAAC," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 1211-1249, April.
    16. Dieter Verhaest & Eddy Omey, 2006. "The Impact of Overeducation and its Measurement," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 77(3), pages 419-448, July.
    17. Juan Acosta-Ballesteros & María del Pilar Osorno-del Rosal & Olga María Rodríguez-Rodríguez, 2018. "Overeducation of Young Workers in Spain: How Much Does the First Job Matter? Social Indicators Research," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 109-139, July.
    18. Morsy, Hanan & Mukasa, Adamon, 2019. "Youth Jobs, Skill and Educational Mismatches in Africa," MPRA Paper 100394, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Ingrid Linsley, 2005. "Causes of Overeducation in the Australian Labour Market," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 940, The University of Melbourne.
    20. Hanan Morsy & Adamon N. Mukasa, 2019. "Working Paper 326 - Youth Jobs, Skill and Educational Mismatches in Africa," Working Paper Series 2452, African Development Bank.
    21. Felix Buchel & Antje Mertens, 2004. "Overeducation, undereducation, and the theory of career mobility," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(8), pages 803-816.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ijf:ijfiec:v:9:y:2004:i:2:p:151-164. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1076-9307/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing or Christopher F. Baum (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1076-9307/ .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.