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Negative Assimilation: How Immigrants Experience Economic Mobility in Japan

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  • Ayumi Takenaka
  • Makiko Nakamuro
  • Kenji Ishida

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Suggested Citation

  • Ayumi Takenaka & Makiko Nakamuro & Kenji Ishida, 2016. "Negative Assimilation: How Immigrants Experience Economic Mobility in Japan," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 506-533, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:intmig:v:50:y:2016:i:2:p:506-533
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/imre.12129
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter S. Li, 2001. "The Market Worth of Immigrants' Educational Credentials," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 27(1), pages 23-38, March.
    2. Barry R. Chiswick & Paul W. Miller, 2012. "Negative and Positive Assimilation, Skill Transferability, and Linguistic Distance," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(1), pages 35-55.
    3. Agnieszka Kanas & Barry R. Chiswick & Tanja Lippe & Frank Tubergen, 2012. "Social Contacts and the Economic Performance of Immigrants: A Panel Study of Immigrants in G ermany," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 680-709, September.
    4. George J. Borjas, 2006. "Making it in America: Social Mobility in the Immigrant Population," NBER Working Papers 12088, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    6. Douglas J. Krupka, 2009. "Location-Specific Human Capital, Location Choice And Amenity Demand," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(5), pages 833-854.
    7. Barry R. Chiswick & W. Miller, 2011. "The “Negative†Assimilation of Immigrants: A Special Case," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 64(3), pages 502-525, April.
    8. Ana M. Ferrer & W. Craig Riddell, 2002. "The role of credentials in the Canadian labour market," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 879-905, November.
    9. Borjas, George J, 1993. "The Intergenerational Mobility of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 113-135, January.
    10. Tachibanaki, Toshiaki, 1988. "Education, occupation, hierarchy and earnings," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 221-229, April.
    11. Theodore P. Lianos & D. Asteriou & G.M. Agiomirgianakis, 2004. "Foreign university graduates in the Greek labour market: Employment, salaries and overeducation," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(2), pages 151-164.
    12. Bernt Bratsberg & James F. Ragan Jr., 2002. "The Impact of Host-Country Schooling on Earnings: A Study of Male Immigrants in the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(1), pages 63-105.
    13. Julie DaVanzo & Peter Morrison, 1981. "Return and other sequences of migration in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 18(1), pages 85-101, February.
    14. Ilana Akresh, 2007. "U.S. Immigrants’ labor market adjustment: Additional Human capital investment and Earnings Growth," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 865-881, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. LIU Yang, 2018. "Labor Segmentation and the Outmigration Intention of Highly Skilled Foreign Workers: Evidence from Asian-born foreign workers in Japan," Discussion papers 18028, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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